Robotic hysterectomy usage up for benign disease

September 15, 2013
Robotic hysterectomy usage up for benign disease
The use of robotic hysterectomy procedures has significantly increased, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

(HealthDay)—The use of robotic hysterectomy procedures has significantly increased, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Eric B. Rosero, M.D., from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and colleagues utilized the 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample to identify matched cohorts of women undergoing robotic and laparoscopic hysterectomy for benign disease.

The researchers found that there were 804,551 hysterectomies performed for benign conditions, of which 20.6 percent were laparoscopic and 5.1 percent were robotically assisted. The use of robotic hysterectomy for minimally invasive procedures increased significantly, from 9.5 to 13.6 percent from 2009 to 2010. The overall complication rates were similar between robotic and laparoscopic hysterectomy (8.80 versus 8.85 percent; relative risk, 0.99; P = 0.910); however, the incidence of blood transfusions was significantly lower in robotic cases (2.1 versus 3.1 percent; P < 0.001), while patients undergoing robotic hysterectomy were more likely to experience postoperative pneumonia (relative risk, 2.2; P = 0.005). Robotic hysterectomy patients had significantly higher median hospital care costs (an average of $2,489 higher) compared to those undergoing laparoscopic procedures.

"Perioperative outcomes are similar between laparoscopic and robotic , but robotic cases cost substantially more," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: Increase seen in use of robotically-assisted hysterectomy for benign gynecologic disorders

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