Weight loss surgery effective in kidney disease patients, but side effects are high

November 7, 2013

Kidney disease patients who undergo weight loss surgery can successfully lose weight, but many experience significant side effects, according to a study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2013 November 5-10 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, GA.

Weight loss, or bariatric, surgery is currently the most effective treatment for obesity, but recent evidence suggests the may be higher in those with chronic than in those without. To investigate, Helen MacLaughlin (King's College London) and her colleagues conducted a retrospective study of all obese patients with kidney disease who underwent laparoscopic bariatric surgery in three major London teaching hospitals from 2007 to 2012.

Information obtained from the 74 patients' medical records revealed that across all forms of surgery, excess weight was lost in 61% of patients one year post-surgery. There were 16 adverse events, including two deaths (3%) related to surgical complications. Acute kidney injury was most frequent (4%), followed by leak (3%), acidosis and elevated blood potassium levels (3%), post-operative chest infection (3%), vitamin B12/iron deficiency (3%), fistula/graft failure (3%), and heart attacks (1%). An additional four deaths occurred during the study period, including two related to cancer.

"While bariatric surgery is effective for weight loss in obese patients with , the adverse event and mortality rates are high," the authors concluded. "Identification of risk factors for adverse events and investigation of non-surgical alternatives remain priorities."

Explore further: Weight-loss surgery seems safe for kidney disease patients

More information: Study: "Safety and Efficacy of Bariatric Surgery in Obese Patients with CKD: The London Renal Obesity Network (LonRON) Experience" (Abstract 3076)

Related Stories

Weight-loss surgery seems safe for kidney disease patients

March 1, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Obese chronic kidney disease patients who undergo surgery to achieve weight loss do not face a particularly dangerous rate of complications as a result, a new study suggests.

Findings announced from landmark study on safety of adolescent bariatric surgery

November 6, 2013
Initial results of a first and largest of its kind study focusing on the safety of adolescent bariatric surgery were published this week in JAMA Pediatrics. The "Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery" (Teen-LABS) ...

Improved sexual functioning, hormones after weight-loss bariatric surgery

November 4, 2013
Women who underwent bariatric surgery experienced better sexual functioning, improvement in reproductive hormones, and better health-related and weight-related quality of life, according to a report published Online First ...

Following bariatric surgery, use of opioids increases among chronic opioid users

October 1, 2013
In a group of patients who took chronic opioids for noncancer pain and who underwent bariatric surgery, there was greater chronic use of opioids after surgery compared with before, findings that suggest the need for proactive ...

Body contouring improves long-term weight control after gastric bypass

October 1, 2013
Body contouring surgery to remove excess skin improves long-term weight control in patients after gastric bypass surgery, reports a study in the October issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal ...

Little difference found between self-reported and measured weights following bariatric surgery

November 4, 2013
In an analysis that included nearly 1,000 patients, self-reported weights following bariatric surgery were close to measured weights, suggesting that self-reported weights used in studies are accurate enough to be used when ...

Recommended for you

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

Team eradicates hepatitis C in 10 patients following lifesaving transplants from infected donors

April 30, 2017
Ten patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease. The findings point to new strategies for increasing ...

'bench to bedside to bench': Scientists call for closer basic-clinical collaborations

March 24, 2017
In the era of genome sequencing, it's time to update the old "bench-to-bedside" shorthand for how basic research discoveries inform clinical practice, researchers from The Jackson Laboratory (JAX), National Human Genome Research ...

The ethics of tracking athletes' biometric data

January 18, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—Whether it is a FitBit or a heart rate monitor, biometric technologies have become household devices. Professional sports leagues use some of the most technologically advanced biodata tracking systems to ...

Financial ties between researchers and drug industry linked to positive trial results

January 18, 2017
Financial ties between researchers and companies that make the drugs they are studying are independently associated with positive trial results, suggesting bias in the evidence base, concludes a study published by The BMJ ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.