Video: Brain mechanisms linked to obesity

December 4, 2013 by Hannah Schmidt

Scientists are attempting to tackle obesity by exploring ways of helping people stay healthy. One research project aims at producing junk-free, albeit tasty, food, whereas another looks at better understanding food consumption stimuli.

Fat, sugar and salt - these ingredients are often used by the to enrich their products and provide us with the perfect sensual experience. Now, scientists in France are trying to reverse this trend. They are designing a healthier pizza without compromising on the taste.

In parallel, researchers in Italy want to find out why it is so hard to resist certain foods. They have looked at the reward mechanism of our brain. They have discovered that some of us have a higher brain activity when we eat, smell or just simply look at a chocolate cake.

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As the calorie-rich Christmas season is about to start, it is worth noticing that the can react very differently to food stimulus, and for some of us it is just too tasty to resist.

Explore further: A brain reward gene influences food choices in the first years of life

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