Educated black men remembered as 'whiter'

January 14, 2014, SAGE Publications
These are images of skin tone used in the study. Credit: Avi Ben-Zeev, Tara Dennehy, Robin Goodrich, Branden Kolarik, and Mark Geisler

A new study out today in SAGE Open finds that instead of breaking stereotypes, intellectually successful Black individuals may be susceptible to being remembered as "Whiter" and therefore 'exceptions to their race,' perpetuating cultural beliefs about race and intelligence. This new study shows that a Black man who is associated with being educated is remembered as being lighter in skin tone than he actually is, a phenomenon the study authors refer to as "skin tone memory bias."

"When a Black stereotypic expectancy is violated (herein, encountering an educated Black male), this culturally incompatible information is resolved by distorting this person's skin tone to be lighter in memory and therefore to be perceived as "Whiter," the main researcher, Avi Ben-Zeev, stated.

Researchers Avi Ben-Zeev, Tara Dennehy, Robin Goodrich, Branden Kolarik, and Mark Geisler conducted a two-part experiment with a total of 160 university students. In the first experiment, participants were briefly exposed to one of two words subliminally: "ignorant" or "educated," followed immediately by a photograph of a Black man's face. Later, participants were shown seven photos that depicted the same face – the original as well as three with darker skin tones and three with lighter skin tones. They were asked to determine which of these seven photographs was identical to the one that they had originally seen.

The researchers found that participants who were primed subliminally with the word "educated" demonstrated significantly more memory errors attached to lighter skin tones (identifying even the lightest photo as being identical to the original) than those primed subliminally with the word "ignorant." This skin tone memory bias was replicated in experiment two.

"Uncovering a skin tone memory bias, such that an educated Black man becomes lighter in the mind's eye, has grave implications," Avi Ben-Zeev stated. "We already know from past researchers about the disconcerting tendency to harbor more negative attitudes about people with darker complexions (e.g., the darker a Black male is, the more aggressive he is perceived to be). A skin tone memory bias highlights how memory protects this 'darker is more negative' belief by distorting counter-stereotypic Black individuals' to appear lighter and perhaps to be perceived as less threatening."

Explore further: Eat more vegetables for a healthy glow

More information: "When an 'Educated' Black Man Becomes Lighter in the Mind's Eye: Evidence for a Skin Tone Memory Bias," SAGE Open, 2014.

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jahbless
1 / 5 (1) Jan 14, 2014
Everyone knows that intelligence is correlated with whiteness/fairness of skin. This is why in every society, from the Japanese to the Indians to the Jamaicans, the upper classes tend to be lighter in complexion, and the lower classes are always trying to whiten their skin.
RMQ
not rated yet Jan 14, 2014
"Everyone knows that intelligence is correlated with whiteness/fairness of skin." Where? at the kk klan's meetings?

People in many cultures try to lighten their skin because aging causes the skin (and other tissues) to darken, and people want to look young.
And some black Americans do things to their appearance that are "white" like straighten their hair. In such a racist society, not surprises there.
I see a lot of people, women especially, trying to darken their skins nowadays. It is unhealthy, but they do look better....
And I wonder if the use of anabolic steroids in many men is a way in which they try to look like black men.
RobertKarlStonjek
not rated yet Jan 15, 2014
Perceptual distortion is normal in humans and is a method the brain uses to simplify data (by classifying like with like, even if it has to be shoe-horned to achieve it). It appears the researchers have combined two phenomena into one: the perceptual distortion and the way the perception is distorted in this particular case.

To illustrate the phenomena generally, I believe it is highly likely that if the same study were done on male academics generally they will be remembered as older, age being stereotypically associated with knowledge source (consider the young professor ~ will he she be remembered as being older than they actually appear?)

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