Feds say they fixed Medicaid problem for children

February 8, 2014

The federal government tells a New Hampshire congresswoman they have updated the HealthCare.gov website to fix a wrinkle that temporarily left some children without insurance coverage.

Rep. Carol Shea-Porter wrote to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services after a January report by The Associated Press revealed the glitch.

Children who qualify for Medicaid can't be covered under subsidized family plans purchased through the federal online markets. That left some without coverage until their Medicaid eligibility was determined while others who were rejected for Medicaid still couldn't be added to their parents' plans.

In a letter to Shea-Porter on Friday, CMS says consumers now can use the website to report if someone was denied coverage and take steps to add the child to a subsidized plan.

Explore further: Health law tricky for parents of Medicaid kids

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