German study finds cannabis use triggered 2 deaths

February 26, 2014

(AP)—Scientists in Germany say cannabis use has been linked to the deaths of two outwardly healthy young men later found to have underlying conditions.

Autopsies showed one man had a serious undetected heart problem and the other had a history of alcohol, amphetamine and .

The authors of the report published online this month in the journal Forensic Science International say the men, aged 23 and 28, likely "experienced fatal cardiovascular complications evoked by smoking cannabis."

The researchers from Duesseldorf and Frankfurt's university hospitals say the acute risk from using cannabis is low, but people with potentially serious heart problems should be made aware of the danger.

Explore further: Cannabis link to other drugs

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