Beta-amyloid deposits increase with age, associated with artery stiffness

March 31, 2014, The JAMA Network Journals

Stiffening of the arteries appears to be associated with the progressive buildup of β-amyloid (Αβ) plaque in the brains of elderly patients without dementia, suggesting a relationship between the severity of vascular disease and the plaque that is a hallmark of Alzheimer disease.

Evidence suggested is related to brain aging, cerebrovascular disease, impaired cognitive function and dementia in the elderly.

The authors examined the association between arterial stiffness and change in Αβ deposition over time by using (PET) of the brain to study 81 patients without dementia who were 83 years or older. Arterial stiffness was measured using pulse wave velocity (PWV) at various sites in the body.

The proportion of patients with Αβ deposition increased from 48 percent at the start of the study to 75 percent at the two-year follow-up. Brachial-ankle PWV (a comparison of in the upper arm and lower leg) was higher among patients with Αβ deposition at baseline and follow-up, while femoral-ankle PWV (a comparison of blood pressure in the upper leg and lower leg) was only higher in Αβ-positive patients at follow-up. The accumulation of Αβ over time was associated with greater central arterial stiffness. The authors acknowledge that while Αβ deposition and appear to be associated, the mechanisms for this are not well established.

"This study shows that arterial stiffness, as measured by PWV, is associated with the amount of Αβ in the brain and is an independent indicator of Αβ progression among nondemented elderly adults. … The exact mechanism linking arterial stiffness and Αβ deposition in the brain needs to be elucidated," Timothy M. Hughes, Ph.D., M.P.H., of Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, N.C., and colleagues wrote in their JAMA Neurology paper.

Explore further: In elderly, hardening of arteries linked to plaques in brain

More information: JAMA Neurol. Published online March 31, 2014. DOI: 10.1001/.jamaneurol.2014.186

Related Stories

In elderly, hardening of arteries linked to plaques in brain

October 16, 2013
Even for elderly people with no signs of dementia, those with hardening of the arteries are more likely to also have the beta-amyloid plaques in the brain that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published ...

Study links depression to arterial stiffness during stress

March 14, 2014
(Medical Xpress)—According to a study by researchers at Emory's Rollins School of Public Health, symptoms of depression are associated with an increase in arterial stiffness induced by mental stress. Arterial stiffness ...

Metabolic syndrome linked to arterial stiffness in CKD

June 4, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), those with metabolic syndrome (MetS) have increased arterial stiffness but no increase in endothelial dysfunction, compared to those without MetS, according to ...

Arterial stiffness inversely tied to plasma adiponectin levels

September 27, 2012
(HealthDay)—Arterial stiffness is inversely related to plasma adiponectin levels in young, normotensive patients with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in Diabetes Care.

Cardiac autonomic dysfunction is linked to arterial stiffness

April 3, 2013
(HealthDay)—Cardiac autonomic dysfunction as measured by lower heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with increases in both central and vascular vascular stiffness among youths with type 1 diabetes regardless of underlying ...

A novel method for simultaneously measuring blood pressure and arterial stiffness

February 10, 2012
Arterial stiffness due to is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease but is very difficult to measure. It also can influence blood pressure readings since these rely on the time taken for arteries to return to normal ...

Recommended for you

Brain zaps may help curb tics of Tourette syndrome

January 16, 2018
Electric zaps can help rewire the brains of Tourette syndrome patients, effectively reducing their uncontrollable vocal and motor tics, a new study shows.

A 'touching sight': How babies' brains process touch builds foundations for learning

January 16, 2018
Touch is the first of the five senses to develop, yet scientists know far less about the baby's brain response to touch than to, say, the sight of mom's face, or the sound of her voice.

Researchers identify protein involved in cocaine addiction

January 16, 2018
Mount Sinai researchers have identified a protein produced by the immune system—granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)—that could be responsible for the development of cocaine addiction.

New study reveals why some people are more creative than others

January 16, 2018
Creativity is often defined as the ability to come up with new and useful ideas. Like intelligence, it can be considered a trait that everyone – not just creative "geniuses" like Picasso and Steve Jobs – possesses in ...

Neuroscientists suggest a model for how we gain volitional control of what we hold in our minds

January 16, 2018
Working memory is a sort of "mental sketchpad" that allows you to accomplish everyday tasks such as calling in your hungry family's takeout order and finding the bathroom you were just told "will be the third door on the ...

Brain imaging predicts language learning in deaf children

January 15, 2018
In a new international collaborative study between The Chinese University of Hong Kong and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, researchers created a machine learning algorithm that uses brain scans to predict ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.