Ruling with an iron fist could make your child pack on pounds

March 19, 2014, American Heart Association

If you're rigid with rules and skimpy on affection and dialogue with your kids, they have a greater chance of being obese, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology & Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity & Metabolism Scientific Sessions 2014.

Researchers followed a nationally representative group of 37,577 Canadian children aged 0 to 11. They compared whose parents are generally affectionate, have reasonable discussions about behavior with their child and set healthy boundaries (authoritative) with those whose parents were strict about limits without much dialogue or affection (authoritarian).

The latter group had a 30 percent higher chance of being obese among kids 2 to 5 years old and a 37 percent higher chance among kids 6 to 11 years.

"Parents should at least be aware of their parenting style," said Lisa Kakinami, Ph.D., a post-doctoral epidemiologist at McGill University in Montreal. "If you're treating your child with a balance of affection and limits—these are the kids who are least likely to be obese."

Researchers compared ' answers to a cross-sectional survey. They then categorized and analyzed them with respect to children's body mass index (BMI) percentile.

Researchers also found that poverty was associated with childhood . But parenting style affected obesity regardless of income level.

More than one-third of American children are overweight or obese according to the American Heart Association. Exploring factors at home that may be fueling this public health concern could lead to better prevention and interventions, Kakinami said.

Explore further: Many parents of obese children underestimate their weight

Related Stories

Many parents of obese children underestimate their weight

February 3, 2014
(HealthDay)—Half the parents of overweight or obese children don't think their kids have a weight problem, a new analysis reveals.

Bioethicist discusses targeting parents of obese children

September 23, 2013
(HealthDay)—Parents of obese children should be targeted in an effort to deal with a serious national problem, according to a viewpoint piece published in the September issue of JAMA Pediatrics.

Obesity rate drops 43 percent in young US children

February 26, 2014
While many Americans struggle with extra weight, the obesity rate among US preschoolers has dropped by nearly half in recent years, according to figures out Tuesday.

Parents who set, stick to rules may help kids stay slim

November 27, 2013
(HealthDay)—Parents who set firm rules about behaviors like TV viewing, dinner time and physical activity tend to have children of healthier weights, a new Australian study finds.

Parents should team with kids to encourage exercise

March 5, 2014
Parents can help motivate kids to be more physically active, but the influence may not result in an improvement in their children's body mass index (BMI), finds a new evidence review in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Childhood obesity may quadruple high blood pressure risk in adulthood

September 12, 2013
Obese children quadruple their risk and overweight children double their risk of developing high blood pressure in adulthood, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association High Blood Pressure Research Scientific ...

Recommended for you

Women run faster after taking newly developed supplement, study finds

January 19, 2018
A new study found that women who took a specially prepared blend of minerals and nutrients for a month saw their 3-mile run times drop by almost a minute.

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.