Consuming high-protein breakfasts helps women maintain glucose control

April 29, 2014

In healthy individuals, the amount of glucose, or sugar, in the blood increases after eating. When glucose increases, levels of insulin increase to carry the glucose to the rest of the body. Previous research has shown that extreme increases in glucose and insulin in the blood can lead to poor glucose control and increase an individual's risk of developing diabetes over time. Now, a University of Missouri researcher has found that when women consumed high-protein breakfasts, they maintained better glucose and insulin control than they did with lower-protein or no-protein meals.

"For women, eating more protein in the morning can beneficially affect their glucose and ," said Heather Leidy, an assistant professor of nutrition and exercise physiology. "If you eat healthy now and consume foods that help you control your , you may be protecting yourself from developing diabetes in the future."

Kevin Maki, of Biofortis Clinical Research, completed the study in collaboration with Leidy. They studied women aged 18-55 years old who consumed one of three different or only water on four consecutive days. The tested meals were less than 300 calories per serving and had similar fat and fiber contents. However, the meals varied in amount of protein: a pancake meal with three grams of protein; a sausage and egg breakfast skillet with 30 grams of protein; or a sausage and egg breakfast skillet with 39 grams protein. Researchers monitored the amount of glucose and insulin in the participants' blood for four hours after they ate breakfast.

"Both protein-rich breakfasts led to lower spikes in glucose and insulin after meals compared to the low-protein, high-carb breakfast," Maki said. "Additionally, the higher-protein breakfast containing 39 grams of protein led to lower post-meal spikes compared to the high-protein breakfast with 30 grams of protein."

These findings suggest that, for healthy women, the consumption of protein-rich breakfasts leads to better throughout the morning than the consumption of low-protein options, Leidy said.

"Since most American women consume only about 10-15 grams of protein during , the 30-39 grams might seem like a challenging dietary change," Leidy said. "However, one potential strategy to assist with this change might include the incorporation of prepared convenience meals, such as those included in this study."

Leidy said the study provides a good model to initially examine the effect of higher-protein breakfasts on glucose and responses since only healthy, non-diabetic women with appropriate control were included in the study. Based on the study's findings, the researchers are hopeful that the consumption of -rich breakfasts also would benefit individuals with pre-diabetes, although future research is needed to confirm.

The research, "Acute Effects of Higher Protein, Sausage and Egg-based Convenience Breakfast Meals on Postprandial Glucose Homeostasis in Healthy, Premenopausal Women," will be presented at the 2014 Experimental Biology meeting this week in San Diego, Calif. Leidy collaborated with researchers Tia M. Rains, Kristen D. Sanoshy, Andrea Lawless and Kevin C. Maki, of Biofortis Clinical Research, a division of Mérieux NutriSciences in Chicago. Hillshire Brands funded the research.

Explore further: Protein-rich breakfast helps to curb appetite throughout the morning, scientists find

Related Stories

Protein-rich breakfast helps to curb appetite throughout the morning, scientists find

November 14, 2013
While Americans generally consume enough protein, they tend to eat a small amount at breakfast, moderate amounts at lunch, and the largest amount at dinner. New research presented today at The Obesity Society's annual scientific ...

Protein-rich breakfasts prevent unhealthy snacking in the evening

March 26, 2013
Breakfast might be the most important meal of the day, but up to 60 percent of American young people consistently skip it. Now, Heather Leidy, an assistant professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, ...

Fat, protein impact postprandial glucose excursion in T1DM

December 19, 2013
(HealthDay)—For children with type 1 diabetes using intensive insulin therapy (IIT), high-fat (HF) and high-protein (HP) meals increase glucose excursions, with an additive effect observed, according to a study published ...

Insulin sensitivity normally highest after breakfast

October 26, 2012
(HealthDay)—In healthy people without diabetes, glucose responsiveness tends to be higher after breakfast, which may have implications for the design of closed-loop insulin delivery systems for diabetes patients, according ...

Eat a protein-rich breakfast to reduce food cravings, prevent overeating later, researcher finds

May 19, 2011
A University of Missouri researcher has found that eating a healthy breakfast, especially one high in protein, increases satiety and reduces hunger throughout the day. In addition, using functional magnetic resonance imaging ...

Skipping breakfast may make obese women insulin resistant

June 17, 2013
Overweight women who skip breakfast experience acute, or rapid-onset, insulin resistance, a condition that, when chronic, is a risk factor for diabetes, a new study finds. The results, which were presented Sunday at The Endocrine ...

Recommended for you

Scientists discover a new way to treat type 2 diabetes

July 21, 2017
Medication currently being used to treat obesity is also proving to have significant health benefits for patients with type 2 diabetes. A new study published today in Molecular Metabolism explains how this therapeutic benefit ...

Alzheimer's drug cuts hallmark inflammation related to metabolic syndrome by 25 percent

July 20, 2017
An existing Alzheimer's medication slashes inflammation and insulin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome, a potential therapeutic intervention for a highly dangerous condition affecting 30 percent of adults in the ...

Diabetes or its precursor affects 100 million Americans

July 19, 2017
Almost one-third of the US population—100 million people—either has diabetes or its precursor condition, known as pre-diabetes, said a government report Tuesday.

One virus may protect against type 1 diabetes, others may increase risk

July 11, 2017
Doctors can't predict who will develop type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease in which the immune system destroys the cells needed to control blood-sugar levels, requiring daily insulin injections and continual monitoring.

Diabetes complications are a risk factor for repeat hospitalizations, study shows

July 7, 2017
For patients with diabetes, one reason for hospitalization and unplanned hospital readmission is severe dysglycemia (uncontrolled hyperglycemia - high blood sugar, or hypoglycemia - low blood sugar), says new research published ...

Researchers identify promising target to protect bone in patients with diabetes

July 7, 2017
Utilizing metabolomics research techniques, NYU Dentistry researchers investigated the underlying biochemical activity and signaling within the bone marrow of hyperglycemic mice with hopes of reducing fracture risks of diabetics

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.