Docs, patients have different attitudes toward end-of-life care

April 27, 2014
Docs, patients have different attitudes toward end-of-life care

(HealthDay)—Attitudes toward end-of-life resource allocation differ for patients with cancer and their caregivers and for physicians, according to a study published online April 24 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

Daniel J. Rocke, M.D., J.D., from the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., and colleagues examined data from 767 otolaryngology head and neck surgery (OHNS) who used an online tool to create a Medicare health plan for patients with advanced . A limited pool of resources was allocated into 15 benefit categories. The data were compared with those obtained using the same tool by 146 patients with cancer and 114 .

The researchers found that OHNS physician allocations differed significantly from those of patients and caregivers in all benefit categories except home care. On stratification by baseline attitudes toward quantity versus quality of life, there were significant differences in the allocations of patients and caregivers from the group with the opposite attitude in three categories: other medical care, palliative care, and treatment for cancer. For each attitude question, physician preferences were significantly different in only one, nonmatching category: cash, drugs, and home care.

"Patients with cancer and their caregivers have different preferences from physicians," the authors write. "These preferences are, for these and their caregivers, affected by their baseline health attitudes, but physician preferences are not."

Explore further: Attitudes toward end-of-life care: A survey of cancer patients and others in Korea

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Attitudes toward end-of-life care: A survey of cancer patients and others in Korea

May 30, 2011
Attitudes toward end-of-life care for cancer patients vary, but most patients, family members, oncologists and members of the public are receptive to withdrawing futile life-sustaining treatments in people who are dying, ...

Cognitive impairment common among community and nursing-home resident elderly

April 7, 2014
More than 70% of elderly Medicare beneficiaries experience cognitive impairment or severe dementia near the end-of-life and may need surrogate decision makers for healthcare decisions. Advance care planning for older adults ...

Caregivers open to stopping cancer screening as dementia progresses

July 19, 2013
Research from the Regenstrief Institute and the Indiana University Center for Aging Research has found that many family caregivers of older adults with dementia are willing to consider stopping cancer screening of the elderly ...

Physicians who prefer hospice care for themselves more likely to discuss it with patients

December 16, 2013
Although the vast majority of physicians participating in a multiregional study indicated that they would personally enroll in hospice care if they received a terminal cancer diagnosis, less than one-third would discuss hospice ...

Misunderstanding of palliative care leads to preventable suffering

December 13, 2013
A new review says palliative care's association with end of life has created an "identity problem" that means the majority of patients facing a serious illness do not benefit from treatment of the physical and psychological ...

Does palliative chemotherapy palliate?

March 4, 2014
Terminal cancer patients who receive chemotherapy in the last months of their lives are less likely to die where they want and are more likely to undergo invasive medical procedures than those who do not receive chemotherapy, ...

Recommended for you

Study may explain failure of retinoic acid trials against breast cancer

July 25, 2017
Estrogen-positive breast cancers are often treated with anti-estrogen therapies. But about half of these cancers contain a subpopulation of cells marked by the protein cytokeratin 5 (CK5), which resists treatment—and breast ...

Physical activity could combat fatigue, cognitive decline in cancer survivors

July 25, 2017
A new study indicates that cancer patients and survivors have a ready weapon against fatigue and "chemo brain": a brisk walk.

Breaking the genetic resistance of lung cancer and melanoma

July 25, 2017
Researchers from Monash University and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC, New York) have discovered why some cancers – particularly lung cancer and melanoma – are able to quickly develop deadly resistance ...

New therapeutic approach for difficult-to-treat subtype of ovarian cancer identified

July 24, 2017
A potential new therapeutic strategy for a difficult-to-treat form of ovarian cancer has been discovered by Wistar scientists. The findings were published online in Nature Cell Biology.

Immune cells the missing ingredient in new bladder cancer treatment

July 24, 2017
New research offers a possible explanation for why a new type of cancer treatment hasn't been working as expected against bladder cancer.

Anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent inhibits glioblastoma growth and radiation resistance

July 24, 2017
Glioblastoma is a primary brain tumor with dismal survival rates, even after treatment with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. A small subpopulation of tumor cells—glioma stem cells—is responsible for glioblastoma's ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.