Central-line blood infections remain costly for children

May 6, 2014
Central-line blood infections remain costly for children

(HealthDay)—In pediatric inpatient settings, the rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) have improved, but infections remain costly and correlate with high length-of-stay (LOS), according to a study published online May 5 in Pediatrics.

Anthony Goudie, Ph.D., from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock, and colleagues conducted a propensity score-matched case-control study involving children <18 years with inpatient discharges in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (2008 to 2011). To determine the cost and LOS attributable to CLABSI, discharges with CLABSI (1,339 cases) were age- and year- matched to those without CLABSI (2,678 controls).

The researchers found that the mean attributable cost for CLABSI cases and non-CLABSI controls was $55,646 (2011 dollars) and LOS was 19 days. The rate of pediatric CLABSI declined from 1.08 to 0.60 per 1,000 (P < 0.001) between 2008 and 2011. Over the same time period, the estimates of mean costs of treating patients with CLABSI declined from $111,852 to $98,621 (P < 0.001), while the cost of treating matched non-CLABSI patients remained constant at approximately $48,000.

"Despite significant improvement in rates, CLABSI remains a burden on patients, families, and payers," the authors write.

Explore further: Functional issues up in siblings of children with disability

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Functional issues up in siblings of children with disability

July 30, 2013
(HealthDay)—Siblings of children with disability have higher levels of parent-reported functional impairment compared to siblings of typically developing children, according to research published online July 29 in Pediatrics.

Computerized checklist reduces type of hospital infection, study finds

February 24, 2014
A computerized safety checklist that automatically pulls information from patients' electronic medical records was associated with a threefold drop in rates of one serious type of hospital-acquired infection, according to ...

Infection control practices not adequately implemented at many hospital ICUs

January 29, 2014
U.S. hospital intensive care units (ICUs) show uneven compliance with infection prevention policies, according to a study in the February issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the ...

Penicillin 'allergy' complicates inpatient care

March 18, 2014
(HealthDay)—Patients with a history of penicillin "allergy," even though that may be inaccurate, spend more time in the hospital and have a greater risk of acquiring antibiotic-associated infections, according to research ...

Pediatric surgeries often performed in general hospitals

November 26, 2013
(HealthDay)—The volume of general pediatric surgery performed in the United States is high, and these procedures are divided between specialized pediatric institutions and general hospitals, according to a study published ...

Changing part of central line could reduce hospital infections

September 10, 2013
Simply replacing the connector in the IV system in patients with central lines could help reduce deadly bloodstream infections, researchers at Georgia Regents University have found.

Recommended for you

NeuroNext biomarker study explores natural history of infantile-onset SMA

January 9, 2018
Research led by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center to define the natural history of infantile-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has been "critical" to accelerate the development of effective therapies and hasten ...

No link between childhood lead levels, later criminality

December 27, 2017
(HealthDay)— Exposure to higher levels of lead during early childhood can affect neurological development—but does that mean affected kids are doomed to delinquency?

Early puberty in girls may take mental health toll

December 26, 2017
(HealthDay)—A girl who gets her first menstrual period early in life—possibly as young as 7—has a greater risk for developing depression and antisocial behaviors that last at least into her 20s, a new study suggests.

Technology not taking over children's lives despite screen-time increase

December 21, 2017
With children spending increasing amounts of time on screen-based devices, there is a common perception that technology is taking over their lives, to the detriment and exclusion of other activities. However, new Oxford University ...

Higher blood sugar in early pregnancy raises baby's heart-defect risk

December 15, 2017
Higher blood sugar early in pregnancy raises the baby's risk of a congenital heart defect, even among mothers who do not have diabetes, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Injuries from window blinds send two children to the emergency department every day

December 11, 2017
Most homes have them. They help keep our rooms warm or cold and even add a pop of color to tie the décor together. But window blinds can cause serious injuries or even death to young children. A new study from the Center ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.