Florida MERS patient released from hospital

May 19, 2014

A man from Saudi Arabia who is one of three patients diagnosed with an infection from a Middle East respiratory virus in the United States has been released from a hospital.

Officials from the Florida health department and Dr. P. Phillips Hospital said in a news release Monday that the 44-year-old unidentified man has been discharged in Orlando.

They say the man has recovered from the virus and is now testing negative for Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS.

Officials say at least 20 health care workers at two Orlando hospitals came into contact with the man, and they all have tested negative, too.

A man in Indiana was the first U.S. case of the MERS virus, and a man in Illinois picked up a MERS-related infection from that man.

Explore further: CDC: MERS virus spread in US, but 2nd man not sick

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