Schools seek changes to healthier lunch rules

May 5, 2014 by Mary Clare Jalonick

School nutrition directors across the country say government-mandated changes to cafeteria menus have been expensive and difficult to put in place.

Starting next school year, all grains served in schools will have to be whole-grain rich, or more than half whole grain. That includes pastas, rolls, biscuits, pizza crust, tortillas and even grits.

The government is also demanding lower sodium, healthier snacks and more fruits and vegetables.

The requirements are part of an effort to make and breakfasts healthier. The new standards have been phased in over the last two years, with more changes coming in 2014.

But some schools say the targets are not feasible and kids are rejecting the new offerings. They are asking Washington for changes.

Explore further: New school meal standards significantly increase fruit, vegetable consumption

Related Stories

New school meal standards significantly increase fruit, vegetable consumption

March 4, 2014
New federal standards launched in 2012 that require schools to offer healthier meals have led to increased fruit and vegetable consumption, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. ...

Creating healthier habits: School meal program reforming to heighten nutritional standards

August 14, 2012
Schools will resume for many of the nation's youth over the coming weeks and one change parents may notice is healthier meals offered in their children's school meals program.

School lunches to have more veggies, whole grains

January 25, 2012
(AP) -- The first major nutritional overhaul of school meals in more than 15 years means most offerings - including the always popular pizza - will come with less sodium, more whole grains and a wider selection of fruits ...

New rules aim to rid US schools of junk foods

June 27, 2013
(AP)—High-calorie sports drinks and candy bars will be removed from vending machines and cafeteria lines at all U.S. schools as soon as next year, replaced with diet drinks, granola bars and other healthier items.

Some school districts quit healthier lunch program

August 27, 2013
After just one year, some schools around the country are dropping out of the healthier new federal lunch program. They say so many students refused the meals packed with whole grains, fruits and vegetables that their cafeterias ...

Schools help kids choose carrots over candy bars

November 13, 2013
When schools adopt healthful nutrition policies and practices, kids' diets improve.

Recommended for you

Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later life

July 24, 2017
A new study has shown that regularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter.

Study finds 275,000 calls to poison control centers for dietary supplement exposures from 2000 through 2012

July 24, 2017
U.S. Poison Control Centers receive a call every 24 minutes, on average, regarding dietary supplement exposures, according to a new study from the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center, ...

Alcohol to claim 63,000 lives over next five years, experts warn

July 24, 2017
Alcohol consumption will cause 63,000 deaths in England over the next five years – the equivalent of 35 deaths a day – according to a new report from the University of Sheffield Alcohol Research Group.

App lets patients work alone or with others to prevent, monitor, and reverse chronic disease

July 24, 2017
Lack of patient adherence to treatment plans is a lingering, costly problem in the United States. But MIT Media Lab spinout Twine Health is proving that regular interventions from a patient's community of supporters can greatly ...

Alcohol boosts recall of earlier learning

July 24, 2017
Drinking alcohol improves memory for information learned before the drinking episode began, new research suggests.

To combat teen smoking, health experts recommend R ratings for movies that depict tobacco use

July 21, 2017
Public health experts have an unusual suggestion for reducing teen smoking: Give just about any movie that depicts tobacco use an automatic R rating.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Royale
not rated yet May 05, 2014
This is so ridiculous. It's no surprise that kids are 'rejecting' it; in the same way that they reject broccoli at home. "The kids don't like it" is not an excuse to avoid the new rules.
Just keep serving this better food. Eventually the kids will be hungry enough to eat it. After time, they'll grow to enjoy it.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.