Study: Care costs continue slower growth in 2014

May 21, 2014 by Tom Murphy

Benefits consultant Milliman says health care costs for a family with a common employer-sponsored health plan have more than doubled over the past decade.

The firm projects that a typical American of four will spend $9,695 on care this year. That compares with $4,443 spent in 2004. The cost is up 6 percent from last year.

That counts a family's contribution toward insurance premiums, payments at the doctor's office or pharmacy and even bottles of aspirin.

Health care costs have been growing at a slower pace the past few years, but employees are paying a bigger share of the bill.

The actual cost an individual family racks up varies heavily depending on things like how much care they use and the coverage they have.

Explore further: Report projects health care costs to dip slightly

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