Doctors to parents: Start reading to kids early

June 24, 2014 by Lindsey Tanner

The nation's largest pediatricians' group says parents should read aloud to their children every day starting in infancy.

Doing so can enhance and prepare young minds for early language and reading ability.

That's according to a new policy from the American Academy of Pediatrics issued Tuesday.

The academy wants pediatricians to spread the message to parents of and to provide books to needy families.

To help promote reading, the doctors' group is teaming up with the Clinton Foundation's Too Small to Fail program, children's book publisher Scholastics Inc., and a group called Reach out and Read. That works with doctors and hospitals to distribute books and encourage early reading.

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