Drug policy impacts regional trends of ezetimibe use

June 5, 2014
Drug policy impacts regional trends of ezetimibe use

(HealthDay)—Within Canada, regional variation has been noted in ezetimibe use, which is associated with the restrictiveness of publicly-funded drug formularies, according to a study published online June 3 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Lingyun Lu, Pharm.D., from the Western University of Health Sciences in Pomona, Calif., and colleagues conducted a population-level cohort study to examine ezetimibe use in four provinces in Canada. The provinces had a gradient in the restrictiveness of ezetimibe in publicly-funded formularies (most to least restrictive: British Columbia, Alberta, Quebec, and Ontario). Use was examined using IMS Health Canada's data from June 2003 to December 2012.

The researchers observed in ezetimibe use patterns. The lowest monthly increasing rate was seen in British Columbia (most restrictive), which increased from $261 (Canadian dollars) to $21,926 from June 2003 to December 2012 ($190/100,000 population/month). In contrast, the least restrictive Ontario had the most rapid monthly increase, from $223 to $74,030 ($647/100,000 population/month). Quebec and Alberta had intermediate increases, from $130 to $59,690 ($522/100,000 population/month) and from $356 to $37,604 ($327/100,000 population/month), respectively.

"Ezetimibe use remains common, increasing during the past decade," the authors write. "The gradient in use was related to variability in restrictiveness of the provincial formularies, illustrating the potential of a policy response gradient that may be used to more effectively manage medication use."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical, medical device, and insurance industries.

Explore further: Significantly improved chance of heart attack survival with high-potency statin treatment

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Significantly improved chance of heart attack survival with high-potency statin treatment

February 20, 2014
(Medical Xpress)—A study looking at the data of thousands of patients who suffered heart attacks has suggested treatment with high-potency statins offers a significantly improved chance of survival compared to those taking ...

Statins for kidney disease patients: Protection for the heart but no effects on kidneys

May 1, 2014
Lowering LDL cholesterol through statin-based treatment did not slow kidney disease progression within five years in a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). The ...

Evolocumab superior to ezetimibe in lowering LDL cholesterol

March 31, 2014
Evolocumab, an injected form of a class of drugs called PCSK9 inhibitors that lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, also known as LDL-C or "bad cholesterol," outperformed ezetimibe with few side effects in patients unable ...

Antibody combined with statin results in further reduction of cholesterol levels

May 13, 2014
Among patients with high cholesterol receiving moderate- or high-intensity statin therapy, the addition of the human monoclonal antibody evolocumab resulted in additional lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) ...

Elevated cholesterol levels: Benefit of ezetimibe is not proven

September 14, 2011
Elevated blood cholesterol levels are regarded as a risk factor for heart attacks and other cardiovascular diseases. However, this does not necessarily mean that every cholesterol-lowering drug can also prevent heart attacks. ...

Recommended for you

Infections could trigger stroke in pregnant women during hospital delivery

April 20, 2018
Pregnant women who have an infection when they enter the hospital for delivery might be at higher risk of having a stroke during their stay, according to new research.

Compound improves stroke outcome by reducing lingering inflammation

April 20, 2018
An experimental compound appears to improve stroke outcome by reducing the destructive inflammation that can continue months after a stroke, scientists report.

Novel antioxidant makes old blood vessels seem young again

April 19, 2018
Older adults who take a novel antioxidant that specifically targets cellular powerhouses, or mitochondria, see age-related vascular changes reverse by the equivalent of 15 to 20 years within six weeks, according to new University ...

Changing how blood pressure is measured will save lives

April 19, 2018
Traditional methods of testing for high-blood pressure are no longer adequate and risk missing vital health signs, which can lead to premature death, a study co-led by UCL has found.

Eyes of adolescents could reveal risk of cardiovascular disease

April 19, 2018
New research has found that poorer well-being or 'health-related quality of life' (HRQoL) in adolescence could be an indicator of future cardiovascular disease risk.

Obesity linked with higher chance of developing rapid, irregular heart rate

April 18, 2018
People with obesity are more likely to develop a rapid and irregular heart rate, called atrial fibrillation, which can lead to stroke, heart failure and other complications, according to Penn State researchers.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.