Patients' perceived lifetime risk for CVD often inaccurate

June 24, 2014
Patients' perceived lifetime risk for CVD often inaccurate

(HealthDay)—Patients' frequently have a misperception of lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published in the July issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Elisabeth Joye Petr, M.D., from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and colleagues examined the perception of lifetime CVD risk in 2,998 participants from the Dallas Heart Study. The for developing CVD was classified as high (≥39 percent) versus low (<39 percent) according to risk factor burden detailed in a previously published algorithm. A five-point scale was used to assess perception of lifetime risk for myocardial infarction.

The researchers found that 64.8 percent of participants were classified as having high predicted lifetime CVD risk. Family history of premature myocardial infarction, high self-reported stress, and low perceived health all correlated strongly with high perceived lifetime risk (odds ratios, 2.37, 2.17, and 2.71, respectively), after multivariate adjustment. A more modest association was observed for traditional CVD risk factors and high perceived lifetime risk.

"Misperception of lifetime risk for CVD is common and frequently reflects the influence of factors other than traditional risk factor levels," the authors write. "These findings highlight the importance of effectively communicating the significance of traditional risk factors in determining the lifetime risk for CVD."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: Blood glucose measure appears to provide little benefit in predicting risk of CVD

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Blood glucose measure appears to provide little benefit in predicting risk of CVD

March 25, 2014
In a study that included nearly 300,000 adults without a known history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease (CVD), adding information about glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a measure of longer-term blood sugar control, to conventional ...

Healthy living adds 14 years to your life

November 5, 2012
If you have optimal heart health in middle age, you may live up to 14 years longer, free of cardiovascular disease, than your peers who have two or more cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, according to a new Northwestern ...

Resting heart rate predicts overall, cardiovascular mortality

August 21, 2012
(HealthDay) -- High resting heart rates seem to be predictive of increased risk for overall and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and shorter survival times, according to a study published in the Aug. 15 issue of The ...

Middle-age blood pressure changes affect lifetime heart disease, stroke risk

December 19, 2011
An increase or decrease in your blood pressure during middle age can significantly impact your lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to research in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Lifetime risk of developing cardiovascular disease substantial

November 5, 2012
Even in men and women with an optimal cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profile, the lifetime risk estimate for CVD is greater than 30 percent, and is more than 50 percent for men and women overall, according to a ...

Snoring tied to increased cardiovascular risk in women

February 14, 2013
(HealthDay)—For women, snoring is associated with a modest increased risk of stroke, coronary heart disease (CHD), and cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of The American Journal ...

Recommended for you

Could aggressive blood pressure treatments lead to kidney damage?

July 18, 2017
Aggressive combination treatments for high blood pressure that are intended to protect the kidneys may actually be damaging the organs, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests.

Quantifying effectiveness of treatment for irregular heartbeat

July 17, 2017
In a small proof-of-concept study, researchers at Johns Hopkins report a complex mathematical method to measure electrical communications within the heart can successfully predict the effectiveness of catheter ablation, the ...

Concerns over side effects of statins stopping stroke survivors taking medication

July 17, 2017
Negative media coverage of the side effects associated with taking statins, and patients' own experiences of taking the drugs, are among the reasons cited by stroke survivors and their carers for stopping taking potentially ...

Study discovers anticoagulant drugs are being prescribed against safety advice

July 17, 2017
A study by researchers at the University of Birmingham has shown that GPs are prescribing anticoagulants to patients with an irregular heartbeat against official safety advice.

Protein may protect against heart attack

July 14, 2017
DDK3 could be used as a new therapy to stop the build-up of fatty material inside the arteries

Heart study finds faulty link between biomarkers and clinical outcomes

July 14, 2017
Surrogate endpoints (biomarkers), which are routinely used in clinical research to test new drugs, should not be trusted as the ultimate measure to approve new health interventions in cardiovascular medicine, according to ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.