Among weight loss methods, surgery and drugs achieve highest patient satisfaction

June 23, 2014, The Endocrine Society

Obese and overweight Americans who have tried losing weight report far greater overall satisfaction with weight loss surgery and prescription weight loss medications than with diet, exercise and other self-modification methods, an Internet survey finds. The results were presented Saturday at the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society: ICE/ENDO 2014 in Chicago.

"This finding may mean that diet and exercise alone just don't work for a lot of people," said Z. Jason Wang, PhD, the study's principal investigator and director of Health Economics and Outcomes Research at Eisai in Woodcliff Lake, N.J.

The company funded the study, an analysis of data from more than 39,000 respondents to the 2012 National Health and Wellness Survey.

"Drug treatment and bariatric surgical procedures should be considered an integral part of weight management for eligible patients to achieve better treatment satisfaction, which may in turn help patients achieve and maintain better long-term weight loss," Wang said.

Wang and his co-worker, Sharoo Gupta, MS, from Kantar Health in Princeton, N.J., analyzed survey responses for 22,927 obese adults (50 percent women) and 19,121 overweight or who had at least one weight-related health problem (44 percent women). (Approximately 2,900 obese individuals were included in both groups, according to Wang.)

They found that 58.4 percent of were not currently taking any steps to lose weight. Wang said this finding suggests "a dire need to better educate the public about the consequences of and the importance of addressing the problem with their doctors."

Among who were trying to lose weight, 2.3 percent reported that they underwent , such as gastric bypass or laparoscopic gastric banding, or they were taking prescription weight loss medication. Together, these people made up the "Surgery/Rx" group. The other 39.3 percent of obese respondents reported using a self-modification method, which included diet, exercise, weight management programs, and over-the-counter weight loss drugs or supplements.

The percentage of obese respondents who reported being extremely or very satisfied with their weight loss method was 39.3 percent in the Surgery/Rx group versus only 20.2 percent in the group that used self-modification methods, Wang reported. Treatment satisfaction was about the same between those using medication and those who had surgery, he said.

The researchers observed similar findings in the overweight respondents, with 44.4 percent of the Surgery/Rx group being extremely or very satisfied with their treatment compared with 19.7 percent of participants who used self-modification.

Wang's company, Eisai, makes the prescription medication, lorcaserin (marketed as Belviq). Kantar Health administers the annual National Health and Wellness Survey.

Explore further: Study exposes risk of nutritional deficiencies in obese teens

Related Stories

Study exposes risk of nutritional deficiencies in obese teens

May 4, 2014
A new study exposes the risk of nutritional deficiencies in severely obese teens – both those who had weight loss surgery and those who did not.

Weight-loss drug awaiting FDA approval combines antidepressant, addiction medications

June 11, 2014
On Wednesday, June 11, a new prescription weight-loss medication that combines a popular antidepressant with a medication for addiction will be reviewed by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for potential approval.

Two JAMA Surgery studies examine bariatric surgery for type 2 diabetes treatment

June 4, 2014
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery resulted in the greatest average weight and appears to be the best treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) compared to gastric banding and lifestyle intervention in a clinical trial ...

Lap band surgery helps combat diabetes

September 2, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—A trial of gastric band surgery in overweight people with type 2 diabetes has found the surgery resulted in better outcomes for diabetes and weight loss than standard exercise and diet plans.

Diabetes drug appears to work for weight management, reversing prediabetes

June 23, 2014
Nondiabetic obese and overweight people lose more weight, are more likely to reverse prediabetes and are slower to develop type 2 diabetes when they take the diabetes drug liraglutide in addition to dieting and exercising, ...

Overweight adults back weight-loss health benefits

April 11, 2013
(HealthDay)—Most overweight adults feel that specific weight-loss benefits offered by health plans would be helpful, but few are willing to pay extra for them, according to a study published online April 9 in the American ...

Recommended for you

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

Can muesli help against arthritis?

January 15, 2018
It is well known that healthy eating increases a general sense of wellbeing. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fibre-rich diet can have a positive influence ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.