80 percent of aortic stenosis patients are in the same/better health 1 year after treatment

July 31, 2014

A survey, published online in the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, of 13,860 patients who had undergone interventions for aortic valve disease in Germany has revealed that over 80% were in the same or a better state of health one year after the intervention, and was satisfied with the procedural outcome.

Aortic stenosis – the narrowing of the aortic valve in the heart – is the most frequent in the aging Western population, and the prognosis of this disease in symptomatic patients with conservative therapy is poor. As a result, surgical (AVR) has become the therapeutic gold standard with well-documented benefits in terms of symptom relief and survival. During the past decade, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a minimally invasive alternative for higher-risk patients, and the number of these procedures being carried out in Germany and Europe as a whole has increased in recent years.

Prof. Dr. Friedrich W. Mohr and colleagues used the German Aortic Valve Registry (GARY) to look at the 13,860 registered patients undergoing either AVR or TAVR procedures from 2011. Enrolment in the Registry was voluntary, and took place in 78 German centres. Baseline, procedural, and outcome data, including quality of life, were acquired up to one year post-intervention. Vital status at one year was known for just over 98% of patients.

One-year mortality was 6.7% (6,523) for conventional AVR patients and 11% (3,464) for patients who underwent AVR with coronary artery bypass grafting. One-year mortality 20.7% and 28% in transvascular TAVR and transapical TAVR procedures respectively. However, if patients were stratified into four risk groups, the highest-risk cohorts showed the same mortality at one year regardless of type of therapy.

Over 80% of patients in all groups were in the same or better state of health at one year post-intervention and were satisfied with the procedural outcome.

Prof. Dr. Mohr said: 'GARY is unique in that it includes all interventional and surgical treatment options for aortic valve disease that are currently available in Germany. Our aim was to obtain a comprehensive and contemporary picture of the current practice of aortic valve intervention therapy and to create an independent database that will allow for long-term follow-up of those patients.

'The acceptance of this voluntary registry is demonstrated by the fact that 55% of all procedures performed in Germany in 2011 were included, with an increasing recruitment rate observed in 2012. In addition, a good follow-up rate of 98.5% with regards to vital status and 90% for clinical information was achieved.

'The one-year results of the German Aortic Valve Registry confirm in a large "real world", all-comer patient population that conventional surgery in operable patients yields excellent results in all risk groups. TAVR is being performed in a significant proportion of cases and is a good alternative for high-risk patients. Continuation of the registry and long-term follow-up will help to develop robust future risk models to predict patient outcomes for each treatment option in patients with aortic stenosis.'

Explore further: Availability of transcatheter repair of aortic stenosis benefits patients

Related Stories

Availability of transcatheter repair of aortic stenosis benefits patients

January 30, 2014
The introduction of minimally invasive transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for treatment of aortic stenos not only has increased the number of patients eligible for aortic valve replacement (AVR), but also has led ...

Study examines survival following repair of failed bioprosthetic aortic valves

July 8, 2014
In an analysis of about 460 patients with failed bioprosthetic aortic valves who underwent transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation, overall survival at one year was 83 percent, with survival associated with surgical valve ...

Study confirms benefits of transcatheter aortic valve replacement over 3 years

October 24, 2012
A study found that transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) yielded lower mortality rates after three years compared with medical therapy in patients deemed to be ineligible for conventional aortic valve surgery. Results ...

Rate of aortic valve replacement for elderly patients has increased; outcomes improved

November 17, 2013
Jose Augusto Barreto-Filho, M.D., Ph.D., of the Federal University of Sergipe and the Clinica e Hospital Sao Lucas, Sergipe, Brazil, and colleagues assessed procedure rates and outcomes of surgical aortic valve replacement ...

Repeat sternotomy for aortic valve replacement safe option for octogenarian patients

March 26, 2014
Surgical aortic valve replacement generally improves patients' symptoms and prolongs survival. However, the perceived risk of surgical aortic valve replacement in patients over 80 may result in surgery being denied or a recommendation ...

Study compares heart valve systems

March 30, 2014
Among patients undergoing aortic valve replacement using a catheter tube, a comparison of two types of heart valve technologies, balloon-expandable or self-expandable valve systems, found a greater rate of device success ...

Recommended for you

Could aggressive blood pressure treatments lead to kidney damage?

July 18, 2017
Aggressive combination treatments for high blood pressure that are intended to protect the kidneys may actually be damaging the organs, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests.

Quantifying effectiveness of treatment for irregular heartbeat

July 17, 2017
In a small proof-of-concept study, researchers at Johns Hopkins report a complex mathematical method to measure electrical communications within the heart can successfully predict the effectiveness of catheter ablation, the ...

Concerns over side effects of statins stopping stroke survivors taking medication

July 17, 2017
Negative media coverage of the side effects associated with taking statins, and patients' own experiences of taking the drugs, are among the reasons cited by stroke survivors and their carers for stopping taking potentially ...

Study discovers anticoagulant drugs are being prescribed against safety advice

July 17, 2017
A study by researchers at the University of Birmingham has shown that GPs are prescribing anticoagulants to patients with an irregular heartbeat against official safety advice.

Protein may protect against heart attack

July 14, 2017
DDK3 could be used as a new therapy to stop the build-up of fatty material inside the arteries

Heart study finds faulty link between biomarkers and clinical outcomes

July 14, 2017
Surrogate endpoints (biomarkers), which are routinely used in clinical research to test new drugs, should not be trusted as the ultimate measure to approve new health interventions in cardiovascular medicine, according to ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.