Antidepressants vary in their contribution to weight gain

Antidepressants vary in their contribution to weight gain

(HealthDay)—Antidepressants vary modestly in the likelihood of contributing to weight gain, according to a study published in the August issue of JAMA Psychiatry.

Sarah R. Blumenthal, from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues identified 22,610 of a large New England health care system who began receiving an index antidepressant prescription and had available weight data in .

In models adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical features, the researchers observed a significantly decreased rate of weight gain in individuals treated with bupropion (P = 0.02), amitriptyline (P = 0.001), and nortriptyline (P < 0.001), compared with citalopram. Among individuals discontinuing treatment prior to 12 months, differences were smaller.

"Antidepressants differ modestly in their propensity to contribute to ," the authors write. "Short-term investigations may be insufficient to characterize and differentiate this risk."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.


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Weight gain following antidepressant use examined

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Journal information: JAMA Psychiatry

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