There's no such thing as a vaginal orgasm, review finds

G-spot, vaginal, or clitoral orgasms are all incorrect terms, experts say. In a recent Clinical Anatomy review, they argue that like 'male orgasm', 'female orgasm' is the correct term.

The authors note that the majority of women worldwide do not have orgasms during intercourse: as a matter of fact, female sexual dysfunctions are popular because they are based on something that does not exist, i.e. the vaginal .

The key to female orgasm is the female penis—the clitoris, vestibular bulbs and pars intermedia, labia minora, and corpus spongiosum of the female urethra. In all women, orgasm is always possible if the female erectile organs are effectively stimulated.

"Male ejaculation does not automatically mean the end of sex for women; touching and kissing can be continued almost indefinitely, and noncoital sexual acts after male ejaculation can be used to produce orgasm in women," said co-author Dr. Vincenzo Puppo.


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More information: Puppo, V. and Puppo, G. (2014), Anatomy of sex: Revision of the new anatomical terms used for the clitoris and the female orgasm by sexologists. Clin. Anat.. DOI: 10.1002/ca.22471
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Citation: There's no such thing as a vaginal orgasm, review finds (2014, October 6) retrieved 20 February 2020 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-10-vaginal-orgasm.html
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