Propranolol seems prophylactic against infantile hemangiomas

Propranolol seems prophylactic against infantile hemangiomas

(HealthDay)—Propranolol seems to be prophylactic against infantile hemangiomas, according to a case report published online March 16 in Pediatrics.

Rocío Porcel Chacón, M.D., from the Costa del Sol Hospital in Marbella, Spain, and colleagues presented the case of a male infant with who started treatment with propranolol shortly after birth. Treatment was suspended after seven months when the patient had suffered various respiratory exacerbations.

The researchers found that one week after treatment suspension, multiple (multifocal infantile hemangiomas) began to appear, with no extracutaneous involvement. The skin lesions improved rapidly, and some disappeared completely, after resumption of treatment with propranolol, at lower doses than before. At age 16 months, treatment was definitively withdrawn, with slight lesion recurrence.

"The case described is of multifocal infantile hemangiomas without extracutaneous involvement appearing beyond the neonatal period after treatment with beginning in the first days of life," the authors write. "The details of the case support the hypothesis that this drug is not only therapeutic but also plays a prophylactic role against ."


Explore further

Propranolol effective for infantile hemangioma

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Journal information: Pediatrics

Copyright © 2015 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Citation: Propranolol seems prophylactic against infantile hemangiomas (2015, March 17) retrieved 20 August 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-03-propranolol-prophylactic-infantile-hemangiomas.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
7 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more