Strong statin-diabetes link seen in large study of Tricare patients

May 7, 2015, Veterans Affairs Research Communications
Strong statin-diabetes link seen in large study of Tricare patients
A pharmacist scans a prescription at the Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst pharmacy, serving Tricare customers. New VA research based on the records of nearly 26,000 Tricare patients shows a link between statin drugs and increased diabetes risk. Credit: Airman 1st Class Lauren Pitts

In a database study of nearly 26,000 beneficiaries of Tricare, the military health system, those taking statin drugs to control their cholesterol were 87 percent more likely to develop diabetes.

The study, reported online April 28, 2015, in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, confirms past findings on the link between the widely prescribed drugs and risk. But it is among the first to show the connection in a relatively healthy group of people. The study included only people who at baseline were free of heart disease, diabetes, and other severe chronic disease.

"In our study, statin use was associated with a significantly higher risk of new-onset diabetes, even in a very healthy population," says lead author Dr. Ishak Mansi. "The risk of diabetes with statins has been known, but up until now it was thought that this might be due to the fact that people who were prescribed statins had greater medical risks to begin with."

Mansi is a physician-researcher with the VA North Texas Health System and the University of Texas Southwestern in Dallas.

The higher the dose, the greater the risk

In the study, statin use was also associated with a "very high risk of ," says Mansi. "This was never shown before." Among 3,351 pairs of similar patients—part of the overall study group—those patients on statins were 250 percent more likely than their non-statin-using counterparts to develop diabetes with complications.

Statin users were also 14 percent more likely to become overweight or obese after being on the drugs.

Mansi points out that other studies have arrived at a similar finding through different research methods.

The study also found that the higher the dose of any of the statins, the greater the risk of diabetes, diabetes complications, and obesity.

A key strength of Mansi's study was the use of a research method known as propensity score matching. Out of the total study population, the researchers chose 3,351 statin users and paired them with non-users who were very similar, at baseline, based on array of 42 health and demographic factors. The only substantial difference, from a research standpoint, was the use of statins. This helped the researchers isolate the effects of the drugs.

"This approach helps us to make comparisons that are fair and balanced," says Mansi.

Study examined records from 2003 - 2012

On a wider scale, looking at the overall comparison between the study's roughly 22,000 nonusers and 4,000 users, and statistically adjusting for certain factors, the researchers found a similar outcome: Users of statins were more than twice as likely to develop diabetes.

The researchers examined patient records for the period between October 2003 and March 2012.

About three-quarters of the statin prescriptions in Mansi's data were for simvastatin, sold as Zocor.

Mansi stresses that the study doesn't definitively show that statins cause diabetes, nor does it mean people should stop using the drugs, which are widely prescribed to help people lower their cardiac risk factors.

"No patient should stop taking their statins based on our study, since is a cornerstone in treatment of cardiovascular diseases and has been clearly shown to lower mortality and disease progression," he says. "Rather, this study should alert researchers, [clinical] guideline writers, and policymakers that short-term clinical trials might not fully describe the risks and benefits of long-term statin use for primary prevention."

Primary prevention refers to warding off disease in the first place.

More research needed

Mansi urges further trials, similar to his group's, to better understand the long-term effects of use.

Overall, besides driving further research, Mansi says he hopes the results will help inform conversations between patients and providers about the risks and benefits of statins.

"I myself am a firm believer that these medications are very valuable for patients when there are clear and strict indications for them," he says. "But knowing the risks may motivate a patient to quit smoking, rather than swallow a tablet, or to lose weight and exercise. Ideally, it is better to make those lifestyle changes and avoid taking statins if possible."

Explore further: Statins linked to raised risk of cataracts in study

More information: Journal of General Internal Medicine, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25917657

Related Stories

Statins linked to raised risk of cataracts in study

September 19, 2013
(HealthDay)—The statin medications that millions of adults take to lower their cholesterol levels may also raise their risk of developing cataracts, a new study suggests.

Study shows that use of statins increases risk of developing diabetes by 46%

April 16, 2015
New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) shows that use of statins is associated with a 46% increase in the risk of developing diabetes, even after adjustment ...

Study shows that use of statins increases risk of developing diabetes by 46 percent

March 4, 2015
New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) shows that use of statins is associated with a 46% increase in the risk of developing diabetes, even after adjustment ...

Musculoskeletal conditions, injuries may be associated with statin use

June 3, 2013
Using cholesterol-lowering statins may be associated with musculoskeletal conditions, arthropathies (joint diseases) and injuries, according to a report published Online First by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Cholesterol drugs' benefits far outweigh side effects, review finds

August 5, 2014
(HealthDay)—The benefits of long-term use of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs greatly outweigh the risks, according to a review of research published over 20 years.

Cardiovascular benefits of taking statins outweigh diabetes risk

August 9, 2012
The benefits of taking statins to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease outweigh the increased risk of developing diabetes experienced by some patients who take these cholesterol-lowering drugs, according to an Article ...

Recommended for you

Southern diet could be deadly for people with heart disease

July 12, 2018
People with a history of heart disease who eat a traditional Southern diet are more likely to die than those who follow a Mediterranean dietary pattern, according to new research.

Late-life high blood pressure may harm the brain, study says

July 11, 2018
Decades ago, hundreds of nuns and priests made an extraordinary decision: They agreed to donate their brains upon death to science, hoping to help solve mysteries about Alzheimer's and other diseases. Now, a study that used ...

Multivitamins do not promote cardiovascular health

July 10, 2018
Taking multivitamin and mineral supplements does not prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death, according to a new analysis of 18 studies published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American ...

Mobile health devices diagnose hidden heart condition in at-risk populations

July 10, 2018
Wearable mobile health devices improved the rate of diagnosis of a dangerous and often hidden heart condition called atrial fibrillation (AFib), according to a first of its kind, home-based clinical study conducted in part ...

Chronic heart disease poses high financial burden to low-income families

July 3, 2018
The financial burdens of long-term care for a family member with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) disproportionately affect low-income American families, even those who have insurance, found researchers at Yale ...

Women with high blood pressure during pregnancy more likely to develop CVD risk factors

July 2, 2018
Preeclampsia and gestational hypertension are common pregnancy complications involving high blood pressure that develops for the first time during pregnancy and returns to normal after delivery. Previous studies have shown ...

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

janitor48
not rated yet May 08, 2015
Duh-I knew that 4 yrs ago when my I was being diaganois, all from taking simvastatin, I hate all statins they make you fat & your joints ache besides becoming diabetic. It sucks. Oh I was put on a statin cause I had a heart attack 6 yrs ago.
JammieXZ
not rated yet May 08, 2015
This study findings confirms many other studies showing a solid link between statin use and diabetes. And, the physiological processes the product (and a popular cholesterol-lowering diet pill) accomplishes that are quite well understood - described at: supplements-and-health.com/garcinia-cambogia-side-effects.html

The medical business and the health authorities keep ignoring it and continue to recommend statins to diabetics. It's insanity on steroid, a sign of a deeply sick culture.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.