Policy makes Plan B more accessible to American Indian women

October 16, 2015 byFelicia Fonseca

The federal Indian Health Service has finalized a policy that makes emergency contraception more accessible to American Indian women.

The written policy released this week requires the to be available to women of any age over the counter at IHS facilities, no questions asked.

Previously, American Indian women had to consult with a provider and get a prescription for the medication that was dispensed on site.

Women's health advocates have said the process was time-consuming and burdensome.

The medication was made available to women 17 years and older at IHS pharmacies under a verbal directive in 2013.

Health advocates pushed IHS for a written policy in line with a 2013 U.S. Food and Drug Administration decision to lift age limits and make it available without a prescription.

Explore further: Pharmacy staff frequently misinform teens seeking emergency contraception

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