Photographs and music lessen patients' anxiety before surgery

February 17, 2016, Wiley

A new study found that viewing photographs combined with listening to music can less patients' anxiety before surgical operations and improve their physical and psychological well-being.

Listening to music while viewing photographs led to benefits related to anxiety, heart and respiratory rate, and , compared with only viewing photographs.

The findings suggest a simple way to improve care at a low cost and without medications or invasive treatments, perhaps by playing videos with photos and music on televisions in preoperative waiting rooms.

"Creating different kinds of lists and photographs collections, which the patient can choose depending on his preferences, could be an affordable and low risk treatment for preoperative anxiety," said Jose Gomez-Urquiza, lead author of the Journal of Advanced Nursing study.

Explore further: Music reduces anxiety in cancer patients

More information: Jose L. Gómez-Urquiza et al. A randomized controlled trial of the effect of a photographic display with and without music on pre-operative anxiety, Journal of Advanced Nursing (2016). DOI: 10.1111/jan.12937

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