Can healthy eating reduce diabetes risk?

June 29, 2016
Credit: Wikipedia.

A diet rich in vegetables and fruit may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, according to research published in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition. The study identified a combination of foods that reduce biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress, known risk factors for type 2 diabetes. This dietary pattern, high in vegetables and fruit, and low in chips, sugar, and white bread, is also associated with reduced prevalence of type 2 diabetes.

Louise McGeoghegan and colleagues from the Institute of Health and Society and Human Nutrition Research Centre, Newcastle University analysed over 1,500 adult members from years one to four of the cross-sectional National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) Rolling Programme. The NDNS is an annual survey that runs in the United Kingdom and which was designed to assess the food consumption and nutritional status of the British population. In the new published article, the authors analysed data on two blood biomarkers measured in the survey members: serum C-reactive protein to assess inflammation, and plasma carotenoid to evaluate oxidative stress. Using these biomarkers, they derived a dietary pattern that was linked to lower inflammation and higher anti-oxidant status, which was in turn found to be related to lower prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, the percentage of energy intake from protein was higher in this pattern, although the authors caution that further research is needed to clarify the type of protein consumed and whether it was of plant or animal origin.

"This research points towards the importance of improving our understanding of the relation between diet as a whole and chronic disease outcomes such as type 2 diabetes," the authors say, adding, "Though we know that individual foods may reduce inflammation and oxidative stress, we know little of how foods interact together and in relation to nutrients to achieve a desired health outcome. The NDNS has been a valuable survey in advancing our understanding of how diet impacts our health, not only because of the comprehensive dietary information collected within this survey that enables us to see real-life examples of diets within the UK, but more so because it provides us with a detailed insight into specific health biomarkers. If such measures are to be continued in future, we will be able to understand even more how the diet of people with undiagnosed or diagnosed diabetes differs from people who do not have diabetes. We would like to thank Diabetes UK for funding the initial analysis of blood glucose which gave us this rare opportunity to study the relationship between and type 2 prevalence in the United Kingdom."

Explore further: Healthy plant-based diet linked with substantially lower type 2 diabetes risk

More information: L. McGeoghegan et al. Association between an anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant dietary pattern and diabetes in British adults: results from the national diet and nutrition survey rolling programme years 1–4, International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition (2016). DOI: 10.1080/09637486.2016.1179268

Related Stories

Healthy plant-based diet linked with substantially lower type 2 diabetes risk

June 14, 2016
Consuming a plant-based diet—especially one rich in high-quality plant foods such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and legumes—is linked with substantially lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according ...

Junk food causes similar high blood sugar levels as type 2 diabetes

May 10, 2016
A junk food diet can cause as much damage to the kidney as diabetes, according to a study published in Experimental Physiology.

Animal-source, low-carb diet ups T2DM risk with past GDM

November 25, 2015
(HealthDay)—For women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD), particularly one from animal-source foods, is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), ...

Food processing linked to an increase in type 2 diabetes

May 4, 2016
Modern methods of food production and processing have contributed to a dramatic escalation of type 2 diabetes diagnoses in Australia and the associated financial cost is expected to double to more than $2 billion by 2025.

High protein diets, from both animal and plant sources, improve blood sugar control in diabetic patients

September 17, 2015
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) shows that high protein diets improve blood sugar control in patients with type 2 diabetes without any adverse ...

High serum omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations linked to lower risk of type 2 diabetes

March 24, 2016
A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that high serum omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations are linked to a significantly reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. The findings were published in the ...

Recommended for you

Study identifies blood vessel as a therapeutic target for diabetes

September 14, 2017
Blood vessels have an often overlooked role of regulating the transfer of nutrients from the blood to organs in the body. In a new Yale-led study, researchers have identified a role of a secreted protein, apelin, in regulating ...

Drug for type 2 diabetes provides significant benefits to type 1 diabetic patients

September 14, 2017
A majority of patients with Type 1 diabetes who were treated with dapagliflozin, a Type 2 diabetes medicine, had a significant decline in their blood sugar levels, according to a new study published in The Lancet Diabetes ...

Could swine flu be linked to type 1 diabetes?

September 14, 2017
(HealthDay)—Young people who've been infected with the H1N1 swine flu virus may be at increased risk for type 1 diabetes, a new study suggests.

Epigenetic 'fingerprint' identifies diabetes risk

September 14, 2017
Deakin researchers have identified an epigenetic marker that predicts risk of type 2 diabetes in women with gestational diabetes.

Time to dial back on diabetes treatment in older patients? Study finds 11 percent are overtreated

September 14, 2017
Anyone with diabetes who takes blood sugar medication knows their doctor prescribed it to help them. After all, the long-term effects of elevated blood sugar can harm everything from the heart and kidneys to the eyes and ...

Novel way to present pancreatic proteins increases the sensitivity of type 1 diabetes tests

September 13, 2017
Researchers from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Stanford University and the University of Florida report the development of a novel antibody detection technology that holds promise for improving the accuracy ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.