Review links anxiety disorders to risk of cardiovascular events

August 15, 2016

(HealthDay)—Anxiety disorders are associated with a range of cardiovascular events, according to a meta-analysis published in the Aug. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Connor A. Emdin, from the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, and colleagues conducted a systematic review of the literature to examine the correlation between anxiety and cardiovascular diseases. Forty-six cohort studies involving participants with and without anxiety, including individuals with anxiety, worry, posttraumatic stress disorder, phobic anxiety, and panic disorder, were reviewed.

The researchers found that anxiety correlated with a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular mortality, coronary heart disease, stroke, and heart failure (relative risks, 1.41, 1.41, 1.71, and 1.35, respectively). There was no significant correlation for anxiety with major or atrial fibrillation, although the confidence intervals were wide. Compared with other , phobic anxiety correlated with a higher risk of coronary heart disease; was associated with an elevated risk of stroke. In sensitivity analyses the results were broadly consistent.

"Anxiety disorders are associated with an elevated risk of a range of different cardiovascular events, including stroke, , heart failure, and cardiovascular death," the authors write. "Whether these associations are causal is unclear."

Explore further: Irregular heartbeat stronger risk factor for heart disease and death in women than in men

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Review: Hatha yoga beneficial for reducing anxiety

May 24, 2016

(HealthDay)—Hatha yoga is effective for reducing anxiety, and efficacy increases with increasing number of practice hours, according to a meta-analysis published online May 20 in the Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine.

Recommended for you

Limiting protein reduces post-heart attack injury in mice

March 23, 2017

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 735,000 Americans experience a heart attack each year. Opening a blocked coronary artery to restore blood flow to the heart prevents sudden cardiac ...

New tests help better stroke outcomes

March 23, 2017

Stroke patient rehabilitation can now be improved with a simple process that is helping therapists accurately predict how well their patients will regain the use of their hands and arms after a stroke.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.