Keratin hydrogels show significant potential to regenerate lost muscle tissue and function

April 27, 2017, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

The use of human hair-derived keratin biomaterials to regenerate skeletal muscle has shown promise in new research that documents significant increases in both new muscle tissue formation and muscle function among mouse models of volumetric muscle loss. Two new studies that compare muscle regeneration following treatment with keratin hydrogels, no repair, or an alternative tissue matrix are published in in Tissue Engineering, Part A.

In "Cell and Growth Factor-Loaded Keratin Hydrogels for Treatment of Volumetric Muscle Loss (VML) in Mouse Model," Hannah Baker, PhD, Juliana Passipieri, PhD, George Christ, PhD, and coauthors from University Maryland (College Park), University of Virginia (Charlottesville), Wake Forest University and KeraNetics, LLC (Winston-Salem, NC), and Miami University (Oxford, OH) report that mice with an area of substantial mass loss that were treated with keratin hydrogels and growth factors had the best recovery of muscle contraction force. Examination of the affected muscle two months after treatment showed that mice with greater recovery of also had more extensive new muscle.

In a second study, entitled "Keratin Hydrogel Enhances In Vivo Skeletal Muscle Function in a Rat Model of Volumetric Muscle Loss," Passipieri, Baker, Christ, et al. compared the results of treating a substantial muscle injury in rats using keratin hydrogels with or without growth factors or progenitor cells versus control animals treated with no repair or an alternative tissue matrix. Keratin hydrogel-treated animals recovered up to 90% of the maximum possible muscle function.

Explore further: New approach to muscle regeneration restores function after traumatic injury without need for donor tissue

More information: H.B. Baker et al, Cell and Growth Factor-Loaded Keratin Hydrogels for Treatment of Volumetric Muscle Loss in a Mouse Model, Tissue Engineering Part A (2017). DOI: 10.1089/ten.tea.2016.0457

J.A. Passipieri et al. Keratin Hydrogel EnhancesSkeletal Muscle Function in a Rat Model of Volumetric Muscle Loss, Tissue Engineering Part A (2017). DOI: 10.1089/ten.tea.2016.0458

Related Stories

New approach to muscle regeneration restores function after traumatic injury without need for donor tissue

April 16, 2015
Loss of muscle volume is a common and often debilitating outcome of traumatic orthopedic injury, resulting in muscle weakness and suboptimal limb function. A new therapeutic approach in which small pieces of autologous muscle ...

Gene could play role in body's muscle mass

January 9, 2017
Scientists have identified a gene they think could play a role in determining a person's muscle mass - which is linked to a number of health factors, including how long someone lives.

Promoting muscle regeneration in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy

April 1, 2013
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative skeletal muscle disease caused by mutations in the protein dystrophin. Dystrophin functions to protect muscle cells from injury and loss of functional dystrophin results ...

Huntington's disease affects muscle as well as neurons, study reveals

November 29, 2016
Researchers have discovered that mice with Huntington's disease (HD) suffer defects in muscle maturation that may explain some symptoms of the disorder. The study, "Progressive Cl− channel defects reveal disrupted skeletal ...

New target may slow disease progression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

September 12, 2016
Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a chronic disease causing severe muscle degeneration that is ultimately fatal. As the disease progresses, muscle precursor cells lose the ability to create new musclar tissue, leading to faster ...

Engineering synthetic skeletal muscle

January 14, 2016
We live in an age where new bionic limb models appear every week and tissues can be 3D-printed. Considering these exciting advances, it should come as no surprise that researchers are coming closer to engineering functional ...

Recommended for you

LincRNAs identified in human fat tissue

June 21, 2018
A large team of researchers from the U.S. and China has succeeded in identifying a number of RNA fragments found in human fat tissue. In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine the group describes ...

Scientists solve the case of the missing subplate, with wide implications for brain science

June 21, 2018
The disappearance of an entire brain region should be cause for concern. Yet, for decades scientists have calmly maintained that one brain area, the subplate, simply vanishes during the course of human development. Recently, ...

Key molecule of aging discovered

June 21, 2018
Every cell and every organism ages sooner or later. But why is this so? Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg have now discovered for the first time a protein that represents a central switching point ...

Compound made inside human body stops viruses from replicating

June 20, 2018
The newest antiviral drugs could take advantage of a compound made not by humans, but inside them. A team of researchers has identified the mode of action of viperin, a naturally occurring enzyme in humans and other mammals ...

Research reveals zero proof probiotics can ease your anxiety

June 20, 2018
If you're expecting probiotics to reduce your anxiety, it might be time to put down that yogurt spoon—or supplement bottle—and call a professional instead.

Long-term estrogen therapy changes microbial activity in the gut, study finds

June 20, 2018
Long-term therapy with estrogen and bazedoxifene alters the microbial composition and activity in the gut, affecting how estrogen is metabolized, a new study in mice found.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.