New bill intends to repeal limits on physician-owned hospitals

May 28, 2017

(HealthDay)—A new bill introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives would repeal the federal law essentially banning construction of physician-owned hospitals and making it difficult for these facilities to grow, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

The bill, introduced by Sam Johnson (R-Texas), has bipartisan support, with more than 50 co-sponsors, and has has been referred to the Energy and Commerce and the Ways and Means Subcommittees on Health.

Physician-owned hospitals provide the highest quality of care to patients, and are consistently among the top hospitals recognized for and under the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)-administered Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program. Seven of the top 10 performing hospitals and 40 of the top 100 performing hospitals were physician-owned in the 2017 rankings, despite accounting for 5 percent of hospitals that participate in the VBP. On analysis of CMS payment data, physician-owned hospitals were found to have saved Medicare $3.2 billion over a 10-year period.

"Your bill would level the playing field, allowing physician-owned hospitals to remain competitive, continue their solid record of providing the highest quality of health care to patients, and contribute significantly to the communities they serve," James L. Madara, M.D., of the AMA, wrote in a letter to Rep. Johnson, according to the report.

Explore further: Physician anesthesiologists in many hospitals using modifier QZ

More information: More Information

Related Stories

Physician anesthesiologists in many hospitals using modifier QZ

February 1, 2016
(HealthDay)—Many hospitals that exclusively report the modifier QZ, defined by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to be used for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist service: without medical direction by a physician, ...

Mortality rates at teaching hospitals lower compared with non-teaching hospitals

May 23, 2017
Patients admitted to major teaching hospitals are less likely to die compared with patients admitted to minor teaching or non-teaching hospitals, according to a large national study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public ...

Surgery at high-quality hospitals costs Medicare less than at low-quality hospitals

September 7, 2016
Patients who had major surgery at high-quality hospitals in the U.S. cost Medicare less than those who had surgery at low-quality hospitals according to a new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The difference ...

Hospitals increasingly employing doctors, effects on care uncertain

September 20, 2016
(HealthDay)—Hospitals are increasingly switching to an employment relationship with physicians, but switching has had no impact on primary composite quality metrics, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in the ...

Hospitals measure up for Medicare reimbursement

April 1, 2013
For-profit hospitals are out-performing other hospitals when treating stroke, heart attack and pneumonia patients in emergency departments and, thus, will be more likely to receive bonuses under Medicare's new payment rules, ...

Recommended for you

Why teens need up to 10 hours' sleep

February 21, 2018
Technology, other distractions and staying up late make is difficult, but researchers say teenagers need to make time for 8-10 hours of sleep a night to optimise their performance and maintain good health and wellbeing.

Electronic health records don't reduce administrative costs

February 21, 2018
The federal government thought that adopting certified electronic health record systems (EHR) would reduce administrative costs for physicians in a variety of specialties. However, a major new study conducted by researchers ...

Low-fat or low-carb? It's a draw, study finds

February 20, 2018
New evidence from a study at the Stanford University School of Medicine might dismay those who have chosen sides in the low-fat versus low-carb diet debate.

Tobacco kills, no matter how it's smoked: study

February 20, 2018
(HealthDay)—Smokers who think cigars or pipes are somehow safer than cigarettes may want to think again, new research indicates.

Just a few minutes of light intensity exercise linked to lower death risk in older men

February 19, 2018
Clocking up just a few minutes at a time of any level of physical activity, including of light intensity, is linked to a lower risk of death in older men, suggests research published online in the British Journal of Sports ...

Women who clean at home or work face increased lung function decline

February 16, 2018
Women who work as cleaners or regularly use cleaning sprays or other cleaning products at home appear to experience a greater decline in lung function over time than women who do not clean, according to new research published ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.