Low-dose aspirin no aid against cognitive decline

Low-dose aspirin no aid against cognitive decline
(HealthDay)—Low-dose aspirin does not protect against cognitive decline, according to a review published April 20 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Nicola Veronese, M.D., from the Italian Research Council in Padova, and colleagues conducted a systematic literature review to identify observational and interventional studies that investigated low-dose aspirin and the incidence of and cognitive impairment.

The researchers identified eight studies (36,196 participants). Over a median of six years of follow-up, chronic use of low-dose aspirin was not associated with onset of dementia or (five studies; 26,159 participants; odds ratio, 0.82; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.55 to 1.22; P = 0.33), after adjusting for a median of three potential confounders. In three randomized controlled trials (10,037 participants; median follow-up, five years), the use of low-dose aspirin in individuals without dementia was not associated with significantly better global cognition (standardized mean difference, 0.005; 95 percent confidence interval, −0.04 to 0.05; P = 0.84).

"This review found no evidence that low-dose aspirin buffers against or dementia or improves cognitive test scores in ," the authors write.


Explore further

Review finds no benefit to aspirin for preserving cognitive function

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Citation: Low-dose aspirin no aid against cognitive decline (2017, May 9) retrieved 21 February 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-05-low-dose-aspirin-aid-cognitive-decline.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
2 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more