Pupils wouldn't need doctor's note for sunscreen under bill

May 10, 2017

Rhode Island lawmakers are considering a proposal that would allow students to take sunscreen into schools without a doctor's note.

The state House of Representatives voted unanimously to pass the bill Tuesday. The bill now moves to the Senate.

Concerns about have led several states to loosen restrictions on use in schools.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration labels sunscreen as a medication. Rhode Island's proposal would exempt sunscreen from rules banning students from using over-the-counter medications at schools without special permission.

Washington's governor signed similar legislation into law last week, following Arizona a week earlier.

A Rhode Island school nurse association is opposed to the bill. It says there's a danger of students taking in sunscreen and sharing it with other students who are allergic to it.

Explore further: Kids' sun safety means 'slip, slap, slop'

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