Pupils wouldn't need doctor's note for sunscreen under bill

May 10, 2017

Rhode Island lawmakers are considering a proposal that would allow students to take sunscreen into schools without a doctor's note.

The state House of Representatives voted unanimously to pass the bill Tuesday. The bill now moves to the Senate.

Concerns about have led several states to loosen restrictions on use in schools.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration labels sunscreen as a medication. Rhode Island's proposal would exempt sunscreen from rules banning students from using over-the-counter medications at schools without special permission.

Washington's governor signed similar legislation into law last week, following Arizona a week earlier.

A Rhode Island school nurse association is opposed to the bill. It says there's a danger of students taking in sunscreen and sharing it with other students who are allergic to it.

Explore further: Kids' sun safety means 'slip, slap, slop'

Related Stories

Kids' sun safety means 'slip, slap, slop'

April 28, 2017
(HealthDay)—Children spend a lot of time outside in the summer, so parents need to stay on top of their sun protection, a skin cancer expert advises.

Patients with hyperpigmentation more likely to use sunscreen, few use other sun-protection measures

April 21, 2017
Researchers at Boston Medical Center (BMC) and Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have found patients with hyperpigmentation, a medical disorder that leads to darkening or increase in the natural color of the skin, ...

Indoor tanning, sun safety articles published by JAMA Dermatology

March 3, 2017
Two original investigations on indoor tanning and sun safety by authors from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, are being published online to coincide with their presentation at the American Academy ...

High factor sunscreen can decrease the risk of melanoma by 33 percent

September 14, 2016
A large study published by the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Oslo in the highly ranked Journal of Clinical Oncology found that using high factor sunscreen compared with low factor sunscreen can decrease ...

Look for new, improved sunscreen labels

May 10, 2013
(HealthDay)—New labeling laws for sunscreen will help American consumers choose the product that provides the best sun protection, experts say.

FDA delays rules meant to ease sunscreen confusion

May 11, 2012
(AP) -- Sunscreen confusion won't be over before summer after all. The government is bowing to industry requests for more time to make clear how much protection their brands really offer against skin cancer.

Recommended for you

China's doctor shortage prompts rush for AI health care

September 20, 2018
Qu Jianguo, 64, had a futuristic medical visit in Shanghai as he put his wrist through an automated pulse-taking machine and received the result within two minutes on a mobile phone—without a doctor present.

Time to ban the sale of energy drinks to children, says senior doctor

September 19, 2018
It's time to bring in laws to ban the sale of caffeinated energy drinks to children and young people in England to tackle the twin epidemics of obesity and mental health problems, argues Professor Russell Viner, President ...

For-profit hospitals correlated with higher readmission rates

September 19, 2018
Patients who receive care in a for-profit hospital are more likely to be readmitted than those who receive care in nonprofit or public hospitals, according to a new study published by University of Illinois at Chicago researchers.

Sugar content of most supermarket yogurts well above recommended threshold

September 18, 2018
A comprehensive survey of ingredients in yogurts highlights high sugar levels in many—particularly organic yogurts and those marketed towards children.

Research confronts 'yucky' attitudes about genetically engineered foods

September 18, 2018
Is a non-browning apple less "natural" than non-fat milk? In one case, people have injected something into apple DNA to prevent it from turning brown after it's cut. In the other, people used technology to remove something ...

Your teen is underestimating the health risks of vaping

September 17, 2018
Teens today are more reluctant to smoke cigarettes than their counterparts nearly three decades ago, according to a study released this summer. But parents should hold their collective sigh of relief. The study, carried out ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.