Streptococcal throat infection linked to mental disorders

May 26, 2017

(HealthDay)—Individuals with streptococcal throat infection have increased risks of mental disorders, especially obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and tics, according to a study published online May 24 in JAMA Psychiatry.

Sonja Orlovska, M.D., from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, and colleagues conducted a population-based cohort study with up to 17 years of follow-up to examine the risk of after a streptococcal throat infection. Data were included for 1,067,743 children, of whom 638,265 received a streptococcal test, including 349,982 who had one or more positive test results.

The researchers found that the risk of any mental disorder was increased for individuals with a positive streptococcal test compared to those without a streptococcal test (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.18), especially for OCD and tic disorders (IRR, 1. 51 and 1.35, respectively). There was a further increase in the risk of any mental disorder and OCD after a streptococcal throat infection versus a non-streptococcal throat infection. The risk of any mental disorder, OCD, and tic was also increased among individuals with a non-streptococcal throat infection (IRRs, 1.08, 1.28, and 1.25, respectively).

"Non-streptococcal throat infection was also associated with increased risks, although less than for OCD and any mental disorder, which could also support important elements of the diagnostic concept of pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome," the authors write.

Explore further: Scientists discover protein that plays key role in streptococcal infections

More information: Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Scientists discover protein that plays key role in streptococcal infections

June 1, 2015
The effort to identify new ways of fighting infections has taken a step forward now that scientists have identified a key protein involved in the host's response to strep infections. This protein, called "NFAT," appears to ...

New test for patients with sore throats cuts antibiotic use by nearly a third

November 8, 2013
A new 'clinical score' test for patients with sore throats could reduce the amount of antibiotics prescribed and result in patients feeling better more quickly, research in the British Medical Journal shows.

Review: Rapid antigen tests accurate for strep diagnosis

September 11, 2014
(HealthDay)—Rapid antigen diagnostic tests (RADTs) can be used for accurate diagnosis of group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis for management of sore throat in primary care settings, according to a study published online ...

Recommended for you

Research reveals stronger people have healthier brains

April 19, 2018
A study of nearly half a million people has revealed that muscular strength, measured by handgrip, is an indication of how healthy our brains are.

Overcoming bias about music takes work

April 18, 2018
Expectations and biases play a large role in our experiences. This has been demonstrated in studies involving art, wine and even soda. In 2007, Joshua Bell, an internationally acclaimed musician, illustrated the role context ...

Study suggests we can recognize speakers only from how faces move when talking

April 18, 2018
Results of a new study by cognitive psychologist and speech scientist Alexandra Jesse and her linguistics undergraduate student Michael Bartoli at the University of Massachusetts Amherst should help to settle a long-standing ...

Scientists disconfirm belief that humans' physiological reaction to emotions are uniform

April 18, 2018
How do you feel when you're angry? Tense? Jittery? Exhausted? Is it the same every time? Is it identical to how your best friend, co-worker, or barista feel when they experience anger? In all likelihood the answer is no, ...

How mental health diagnosis should be more collaborative

April 18, 2018
Mental health diagnosis should be a collaborative and useful process, not a meaningless label - according to new research from Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust (NSFT) and the University of East Anglia.

Does pot really dull a teen's brain?

April 18, 2018
Pot-smoking teens may not be dooming themselves to a destiny of dim-wittedness, a new review suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.