Cardiopulmonary exercise testing prognostic in aortic stenosis

August 25, 2017

(HealthDay)—For patients judged as symptomatic or questionably symptomatic for aortic stenosis, an initially conservative management strategy results in good prognosis if cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) does not indicate significant hemodynamic compromise, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Van D. Le, Ph.D., from Roskilde University Hospital in Denmark, and examined whether CPET is prognostically useful for patients judged asymptomatic or questionably symptomatic for aortic stenosis with aortic valve area index <0.6 cm²/m² and left ventricular ejection fraction ≥0.50. Participants were managed conservatively if they had normal peak oxygen consumption and peak oxygen pulse (group 1) or subnormal peak oxygen consumption or peak oxygen pulse with CPET data indicating pathologies other than hemodynamic compromise from aortic stenosis (group 2).

One hundred one were included (median age, 75 years) and 67 percent were judged as questionably symptomatic. The researchers found that the rates of unexpected cardiac death and unexpected hospitalization with heart failure were 0 and 6.0 percent, respectively, at a follow-up of 24 ± 6 months. All-cause mortality was 4 percent, relative to 8.0 percent in a population matched for age and gender. For groups 1 and 2, 37.1 and 38.7 percent, respectively, succumbed to cardiac death, or were hospitalized for heart failure, or underwent valve replacement.

"In conclusion, if CPET does not indicate a significant hemodynamic compromise because of , an initially conservative strategy results in a good prognosis and an acceptable event rate," the authors write.

Explore further: Study examines use, outcomes of valve replacement procedure performed for off-label indications

More information: Abstract
Full Text

Related Stories

Study examines use, outcomes of valve replacement procedure performed for off-label indications

June 21, 2017
Approximately 1 in 10 transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures in the U.S. were for an off-label indication, with similar 1-year mortality rates compared to on-label use, suggesting that TAVR may be a possible ...

Neurological events with TAVI and surgical valve replacement in intermediate-risk patients

May 18, 2017
Patients at intermediate risk for surgery have lower risk of early neurological complications including stroke with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) than with surgical aortic valve replacement, showed results ...

Transcatheter aortic valve implantation shows promise in patients with severe aortic stenosis

April 10, 2012
German researchers report success with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in patients with low-flow, low-gradient aortic stenosis—a special form of aortic stenosis that is difficult to treat. Results published ...

Researchers find transcatheter aortic valve replacement better for patients with severe aortic stenosis

April 4, 2016
Aortic stenosis (AS), the narrowing of the aortic valve opening which restricts blood flow to the aorta, afflicts nearly 1.5 million people in the United States, with approximately 500,000 of them suffering severe aortic ...

Three SNPs linked to aortic stenosis in older adults

July 6, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with aortic stenosis involving tricuspid aortic valves in older patients, according to a study published in the July 1 issue of The American Journal ...

Family history doubles aortic stenosis risk

September 1, 2013
The risk of aortic stenosis doubles when a first degree relative had the disease, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2013 today by Dr. Mattis F. Ranthe from Denmark. The study of 4.2 million people from Danish ...

Recommended for you

Omega 3 supplements have little or no heart or vascular health benefit: review

July 17, 2018
New evidence published today shows there is little or no effect of omega 3 supplements on our risk of experiencing heart disease, stroke or death.

Researchers discover new genes associated with heart function

July 17, 2018
A new study from an international research team, led by Dr. Yalda Jamshidi at St George's, University of London, has identified new genes associated with heart function and development.

Southern diet could be deadly for people with heart disease

July 12, 2018
People with a history of heart disease who eat a traditional Southern diet are more likely to die than those who follow a Mediterranean dietary pattern, according to new research.

Late-life high blood pressure may harm the brain, study says

July 11, 2018
Decades ago, hundreds of nuns and priests made an extraordinary decision: They agreed to donate their brains upon death to science, hoping to help solve mysteries about Alzheimer's and other diseases. Now, a study that used ...

Multivitamins do not promote cardiovascular health

July 10, 2018
Taking multivitamin and mineral supplements does not prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death, according to a new analysis of 18 studies published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American ...

Mobile health devices diagnose hidden heart condition in at-risk populations

July 10, 2018
Wearable mobile health devices improved the rate of diagnosis of a dangerous and often hidden heart condition called atrial fibrillation (AFib), according to a first of its kind, home-based clinical study conducted in part ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.