Depression, anxiety may affect bone metabolism in older teens

August 22, 2017

(HealthDay)—Major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use are associated with bone metabolism in older adolescents and young adults, according to a study published online Aug. 16 in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

Chadi A. Calarge, M.D., from the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and colleagues prospectively followed medically healthy 15- to 20-year-olds who were unmedicated or within one month of starting an SSRI. The authors assessed the correlations between bone measures and MDD, GAD, and SSRI indices.

A total of 264 participants were followed for 1.51 ± 0.76 years. The researchers found that MDD severity was associated with increasing lumbar spine (LS) areal (aBMD), after adjustment for age, sex, vitamin D concentration, physical activity, lean mass or grip strength, and time in the study. In female participants, SSRI use correlated with increasing LS aBMD and bone formation; in males, SSRI use correlated with decreased LS aBMD. GAD was weakly, but independently, associated with increased bone mineralization, after accounting for depression.

"In older adolescents and emerging adults, MDD and GAD are associated with increasing , particularly in the lumbar spine and in females, while SSRIs are associated with increasing bone mass in females but decreasing bone mass in males," the authors write.

Explore further: Depression inversely linked to body composition in teens

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Depression inversely linked to body composition in teens

June 20, 2017
(HealthDay)—There is an inverse correlation for major depressive disorder (MDD) severity with measures of body composition among older adolescents, while a positive association is seen for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors ...

Increase in physical activity in men optimizes peak bone mass

May 21, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For young men, increasing physical activity over a five-year period is associated with improvements in bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD), according to a study published in the May issue ...

Weight loss surgery's effects on bone marrow fat and bone mass

August 9, 2017
Bone marrow fat is thought to regulate bone metabolism, and high levels of marrow fat are seen in states of low bone mass, severe underweight, and diabetes. In a study of obese women undergoing gastric bypass surgery, increases ...

Blood marker may predict postmenopausal women's risk of bone fractures

August 16, 2017
In a study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, blood tests that detect fragments of a protein secreted by bone cells helped to predict fracture risk in postmenopausal women, independently of bone mineral ...

Cholecalciferol may help reduce BMD loss after bariatric surgery

September 21, 2015
(HealthDay)—An intervention including cholecalciferol, protein supplementation, and physical exercise reduces bone mineral density loss after bariatric surgery, according to a study published online Sept. 9 in the Journal ...

Recommended for you

New guidelines to diagnose, manage rare endocrine disorders

July 19, 2018
International guidelines have been published for the first time to help doctors around the globe diagnose and manage patients with a very rare set of endocrine diseases known as pseudohypoparathyroidism and its related disorders, ...

Alcohol-related cirrhosis deaths skyrocket in young adults

July 18, 2018
Deaths from cirrhosis rose in all but one state between 1999-2016, with increases seen most often among young adults, a new study shows.

Childhood abuse linked to greater risk of endometriosis, study finds

July 17, 2018
Endometriosis, a painful condition that affects one in 10 reproductive-age women in the U.S., has been linked to childhood physical and sexual abuse, according to findings published today in the journal Human Reproduction.

Hidden blood in feces may signal deadly conditions

July 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Even if it's not visible to the naked eye, blood in the stool can be serious—a sign of a potentially fatal disease other than colon cancer, new research suggests.

Why men might recover from flu faster than women

July 17, 2018
Men may recover more quickly from influenza infections because they produce more of a key lung-healing protein, a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests.

Broadly acting antibodies found in plasma of Ebola survivors

July 17, 2018
Recent Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreaks, including the 2013-2016 epidemic that ravaged West Africa and the 2018 outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, highlight the need for licensed treatments for this often-deadly ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.