Eating disorders linked to increased risk of theft and other criminal behavior

August 9, 2017, Wiley

In an analysis of nearly 960,000 females, individuals with eating disorders were more likely to be convicted of theft and other crimes.

The incidences of theft and other convictions were 12% and 7%, respectively, in those with anorexia nervosa, 18% and 13% in those with , and 5% and 6% in those without eating disorders. The associations with theft conviction remained in both anorexia and bulimia nervosa even when adjusting for psychiatric comorbidities and for .

The findings indicate that research is needed to investigate the potential mechanisms underlying the relationship between crime and eating disorder psychopathology, as well as efforts to determine how best to address this relationship in treatment.

"Our results highlight forensic issues as an adversity associated with eating disorders. Criminal convictions can compound disease burden and complicate treatment ," said Shuyang Yao, lead author of the International Journal of Eating Disorders study. "Clinicians should be sure to conduct routine reviews of criminal history during assessments for eating disorders."

Explore further: Keep an eye out for eating disorders in loved ones

More information: International Journal of Eating Disorders (2017). DOI: 10.1002/eat.22743

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1 / 5 (1) Aug 10, 2017
Risk for eating disorders increases with healthy adult male facial skin surface lipid pheromone deficiency, so does the risk for criminal/delinquent/borderline/ADHD. Providing the pheromone p.o. diminishes risk to zero for two years. Take extreme precautions not to contaminate staff with pheromone: use respirators, fume hoods, oscillating fans to break up aversive pheromone plumes which cause: irritation, distrust, suspicion, superstition, arrogance, stupidity, and incompetence. Osculation partners of pheromone treated patients come down with artificial jealousy, so isolate treated patients for 40 days to avoid artificial jealousy--which is perceived as real and justified by the patient's family.
Captain Stumpy
not rated yet Aug 10, 2017
@bubba the fraud
Risk for eating disorders increases with healthy adult male facial skin surface lipid pheromone deficiency, so does the risk for criminal/delinquent/borderline/ADHD

repeating your lies will not make them more true, or real

you can't prove human pheromones exist: http://rspb.royal...full.pdf

you also have never once linked or referenced any valid medical or scientific studies that demonstrate any finding you have made claim to

you've claimed hospital tests that never existed, and that you can't verify or validate

of course, those same hospitals in Africa you claimed to test in state you're not only lying about testing there, but that you don't have a medical license and would never be asked to do trials there


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