The role of smartphones in skin checks for early detection of melanoma

September 7, 2017
The role of smartphones in skin checks for early detection of melanoma
Professor Monika Janda with the dermatoscope being trialled to detect melanoma early. Credit: Queensland University of Technology

QUT skin cancer researchers are seeking community volunteers to participate in a skin self-examination study. Performed regularly, self-examination can alert you to changes in your skin and may improve the early detection of melanoma.

Professor Monika Janda, from QUT's Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, said the study aimed to find out how well people can detect suspicious skin spots and if the new imaging technology "mobile dermatoscopes" could significantly increase of melanoma.

"Melanoma is often cured when it is detected before it embeds itself deeper into the body," Professor Janda said.

"That is why early detection by regular checking of or changes can improve survival of melanoma.

"People with that burns rather than tans, who have many moles, a family history of melanoma or a personal history of skin cancers other than melanoma are all at high risk of melanoma.

"This research is testing the use of mobile teledermoscopy which combines a skin microscope with a bright light source attached to a smartphone so that a person at home can send a photograph of a magnified image of a suspicious lesion to a dermatologist," she said.

"The dermatologist could then provide feedback directly to the patient as to whether the lesion needs treatment, a management plan or no further action."

The role of smartphones in skin checks for early detection of melanoma
QUT is seeking volunteers to trial a new smartphone-based way to detect melanoma early. Credit: Queensland University of Technology

People who are 18 years or older who have not had a within the past five years are asked to take part in the study. They will need an iPhone 5, 6 or 7 and live in Brisbane or be willing to travel to Brisbane for a skin check by a doctor. Selected participants will be asked to test the mobile dermatoscope. All participants receive a $50 gift voucher.

To volunteer, contact @qut.edu.au.

Explore further: Why some moles become melanoma still a mystery

More information: SKin INnovation (SKIN) Research Project: skinresearch.com.au/

Related Stories

Why some moles become melanoma still a mystery

August 11, 2017
Testing for two gene mutations commonly associated with melanoma would be insufficient to determine whether a mole could turn cancerous, University of Queensland research has found.

Most melanomas don't arise from existing moles, study finds

August 31, 2017
As the summer draws to a close, it's time to start putting away flip-flops, bathing suits and beach bags. But as the seasonal supplies disappear into the back of the closet, sunscreen should stay within arm's reach for year-round ...

Melanoma isn't the only serious skin cancer

July 27, 2017
(HealthDay)—A type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is increasingly common in the United States, so people need to be alert for signs of the disease, an expert says.

Partners of patients with melanoma find new cancers with skin exam training

June 29, 2016
Skin-check partners of patients with melanoma effectively performed skin self-examinations and identified new melanomas as part of an effort to increase early detection of the skin cancer that can be fatal, according to the ...

New tool to help melanoma's most at-risk group detect cancer early

October 16, 2015
People who examine their own skin for melanoma may increase their chances to find cancers when they are less deep and more treatable than those people whose melanoma is found incidentally.

Artificial intelligence helps with earlier detection of skin cancer

August 23, 2017
New technology being developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo and the Sunnybrook Research Institute is using artificial intelligence (AI) to help detect melanoma skin cancer earlier.

Recommended for you

Lung cancer triggers pulmonary hypertension

November 17, 2017
Shortness of breath and respiratory distress often increase the suffering of advanced-stage lung cancer patients. These symptoms can be triggered by pulmonary hypertension, as scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Heart ...

Researchers discover an Achilles heel in a lethal leukemia

November 16, 2017
Researchers have discovered how a linkage between two proteins in acute myeloid leukemia enables cancer cells to resist chemotherapy and showed that disrupting the linkage could render the cells vulnerable to treatment. St. ...

Computer program finds new uses for old drugs

November 16, 2017
Researchers at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have developed a computer program to find new indications for old drugs. The computer program, called DrugPredict, ...

Pharmacoscopy improves therapy for relapsed blood cancer in a first clinical trial

November 16, 2017
Researchers at CeMM and the Medical University of Vienna presented a preliminary report in The Lancet Hematology on the clinical impact of an integrated ex vivo approach called pharmacoscopy. The procedures measure single-cell ...

Wider sampling of tumor tissues may guide drug choice, improve outcomes

November 15, 2017
A new study focused on describing genetic variations within a primary tumor, differences between the primary and a metastatic branch of that tumor, and additional diversity found in tumor DNA in the blood stream could help ...

A new strategy for prevention of liver cancer development

November 14, 2017
Primary liver cancer is now the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and its incidences and mortality are increasing rapidly in the United Stated. In late stages of the malignancy, there are no effective ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.