Low screening rates for adolescents diagnosed with PID in the nation's emergency departments

September 22, 2017, Children's National Medical Center

The nation's emergency departments had low rates of complying with recommended HIV and syphilis screening for at-risk adolescents, though larger hospitals were more likely to provide such evidence-based care, according to a study presented during the 2017 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) national conference.

Nearly 1 million cases of (PID) are diagnosed each year, and 20 percent of those diagnoses are for females younger than 21. PID is a complication of undiagnosed or undertreated and can signal patients at heightened risk for syphilis or HIV, according to a study led by Monika Goyal, M.D., M.S.C.E., director of research in the Division of Emergency Medicine at Children's National Health System.

"Adolescents account for half of all new sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and often view the emergency department (ED) as the primary place to receive health care. If we are able to increase screening rates for sexually transmitted infections in the ED setting, we could have a tremendous impact on the STI epidemic," Dr. Goyal says.

Although gonorrhea and chlamydia are implicated in most cases of PID, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend that all women diagnosed with PID be screened for HIV and also recommends syphilis screening for all people at high risk for . The research team conducted a cross-sectional study using a database that captures details from 48 children's hospitals to determine how often the CDC's recommendations are carried out within the nation's EDs.

The research team combed through records from 2010 to 2015 to identify all ED visits by adolescent women younger than 21 and found 10,698 PID diagnoses. The girls' mean age was 16.7. Nearly 54 percent were non-Latino black, and 37.8 percent ultimately were hospitalized.

"It is encouraging that testing for other sexually transmitted infections, such as gonorrhea and chlamydia, occurred for more than 80 percent of patients diagnosed with PID. Unfortunately, just 27.7 percent of these young women underwent syphilis , and only 22 percent were screened for HIV," Dr. Goyal says.

Explore further: Emergency departments still missing signs of pelvic disease in teens

Related Stories

Emergency departments still missing signs of pelvic disease in teens

June 14, 2013
Despite government efforts to expand diagnostic criteria for pelvic inflammatory disease, emergency department doctors are not identifying the condition any more often in adolescent girls, finds a new study in Journal of ...

Screen women for chlamydia, gonorrhea, experts say

September 23, 2014
(HealthDay)—All sexually active women should be screened for two of the most common sexually transmitted infections: chlamydia and gonorrhea, according to new recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Chlamydia screening drops after change in cervical cancer screening guideline

July 11, 2017
A 2012 cervical cancer screening guideline change is associated with reduced testing for cervical cancer and chlamydia and reduced identification of chlamydia cases in young women. Screening for chlamydia, the most commonly-diagnosed ...

EDs should be aware of sexually transmitted infection risk in patients

April 30, 2011
All adolescent females who show up in the emergency department (ED) complaining primarily of lower abdominal pain and/or urinary or genital symptoms should be tested for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), according to ...

Teens, young adults bear disproportionate share of STDs

April 28, 2013
In the heat of the moment, it's a good bet sexually transmitted infections are the last thing on a teen's or young adult's mind. Thus, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, young people ages ...

AAP issues guidance on STI screening for teens

July 3, 2014
(HealthDay)—Guidance is provided for screening adolescents and young adults for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in an American Association of Pediatrics (AAP) Policy Statement published online June 30 in Pediatrics.

Recommended for you

Common antidepressants in pregnancy may alter fetal brain development

April 10, 2018
(HealthDay)—Pregnant women who take certain antidepressants may unknowingly compromise the brain development of their child, researchers suggest.

Kids in tough neighborhoods head to ER more often

April 6, 2018
(HealthDay)—Growing up in a disadvantaged neighborhood may mean more visits to the emergency room, a new study suggests.

Infant death study reveals dangerous sleep practices among babysitters, relatives, others

April 2, 2018
Babies who died during their sleep while being watched by someone other than parents often had been placed in unsafe sleep positions, such as on their stomachs, or in unsafe locations, such as a couch, a new study has found.

Reading with your toddler boosts more than just language skills

March 27, 2018
(HealthDay)—All those hours spent reading bedtime stories may pay off for you and your little ones beyond language and brain development: New research suggests it's also good for social and behavioral skills.

Children with autism and their younger siblings less likely to be fully vaccinated

March 26, 2018
Children with autism and their younger siblings are significantly less likely to be fully vaccinated than the general population, according to new Kaiser Permanente research published today in JAMA Pediatrics.

Hoverboard injuries speeding U.S. kids to the ER

March 26, 2018
(HealthDay)—Hoverboards may look cool, flashy and fun, but they're less safe than you might think.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.