Study examines which adolescents benefit most from sleep interventions

November 22, 2017

In a recent study of adolescents, the benefits of cognitive-behavioral sleep interventions were greatest among individuals with higher levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms. The results, which are published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, were consistent across genders.

"We know there is a strong link between , like anxiety and depression, and . In the past some researchers and clinicians have thought that these emotional problems might interfere with sleep improvement treatments, but our results with adolescents show that the opposite is the case," said senior author Dr. Nicholas Allen, of the University of Oregon.

"Those with of emotional problems were actually more likely to benefit from sleep interventions. This opens up new opportunities to use sleep improvement as a way to address mental health."

Explore further: People who worry about insomnia have more health problems than non-worriers, study finds

More information: Matthew J. Blake et al, Who benefits from adolescent sleep interventions? Moderators of treatment efficacy in a randomized controlled trial of a cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness-based group sleep intervention for at-risk adolescents, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry (2017). DOI: 10.1111/jcpp.12842

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