Diabetes, obesity behind 800,000 cancers worldwide: study

November 28, 2017
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Nearly six percent of new cancers diagnosed worldwide in 2012—some 800,000 cases—were caused by diabetes and excess weight, according to a study published Tuesday.

Among the 12 types of examined, the percentage of cases chalked up to these factors was as high as a third, researchers reported in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, a leading medical journal.

Cancers stemming from and obesity combined was almost twice as common among women than men, they found.

And of the two -causing agents, being overweight or obese—above 25 on the body-mass index, or BMI—was responsible for twice as many cancers as diabetes.

The conditions, in reality, are often found together, as obesity is itself a leading risk factor for diabetes.

"While obesity has been associated with cancer for some time, the link between diabetes and cancer has only been established quite recently," said lead author Jonathan Pearson-Stuttard, a clinical research fellow at Imperial College London's Faculty of Medicine.

"Our study shows that diabetes—either on its own or combined with being overweight—is responsible for hundreds of thousands of cancer cases each year across the world."

A surge in both conditions over the last four decades has made the tally significantly worse, the study showed.

The global increase in diabetes between 1980 and 2002 accounted for a quarter of the 800,000 cases, while the over the same period resulted in an additional 30 percent of cases.

On current trends, the share of cancers attributable to the two conditions will increase by 30 percent for women and 20 percent for men in less than 20 years, the researchers warned.

"In the past, smoking was by far the major risk factor for cancer, but now healthcare professionals should also be aware that patients who have diabetes or are overweight also have an increased risk," Pearson-Stuttard, said.

For men, and accounted for a more than 40 percent of liver cancers, while for women they were responsible for a third of uterine cancers, and nearly as many cases of breast cancer.

The threshold for is a BMI—one's weight in kilos divided by one's height (in centimetres) squared—of 30.

Persons with a BMI of 25 to 29.9 are considered to be overweight.

Explore further: Obesity linked to 13 types of cancer (Update)

More information: The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology (2017). www.thelancet.com/journals/lan … fulltext?elsca1=tlpr

Related Stories

Obesity linked to 13 types of cancer (Update)

October 3, 2017
There's a link between obesity and 40 percent of all the cancers diagnosed in the United States, health officials reported Tuesday.

Type 2 diabetes associated with risk of aggressive breast cancer in black women

November 15, 2017
African American women with type 2 diabetes (often referred to as adult-onset diabetes) are at a greater risk for developing breast cancer.

Link between obesity and cancer is not widely recognized

November 17, 2017
A new study published in the Journal of Public Health has shown that the majority of people in the United Kingdom do not understand the connection between weight issues and cancer. Obesity is associated with thirteen types ...

Bigger bodies bringing more cancers

December 8, 2014
Growing obesity levels are increasing the burden of cancers throughout the world, say University of Queensland researchers.

Weight-loss surgery may curb risk for certain cancers

October 17, 2017
(HealthDay)—Weight-loss surgery could help some severely obese people reduce their risk for cancer by at least 33 percent, a new study suggests.

Bariatric surgery lowers cancer risk for severely obese patients

October 6, 2017
Severely obese patients who undergo bariatric surgery lower their risk of developing cancer by at least a third, according to a University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine researcher leading a large retrospective cohort ...

Recommended for you

Magnetized wire could be used to detect cancer in people, scientists report

July 16, 2018
A magnetic wire used to snag scarce and hard-to-capture tumor cells could prove to be a swift and effective tactic for early cancer detection, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Researchers suggest new treatment for rare inherited cancers

July 16, 2018
Studying two rare inherited cancer syndromes, Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists have found the cancers are driven by a breakdown in how cells repair their DNA. The discovery, published today in Nature Genetics, suggests ...

Researchers map 'family trees' of acute myeloid leukemia

July 16, 2018
For the first time, a team of international researchers has mapped the family trees of cancer cells in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) to understand how this blood cancer responds to a new drug, enasidenib. The work also explains ...

Looking at the urine and blood may be best in diagnosing myeloma

July 13, 2018
When it comes to diagnosing a condition in which the plasma cells that normally make antibodies to protect us instead become cancerous, it may be better to look at the urine as well as the serum of our blood for answers, ...

Massive genome havoc in breast cancer is revealed

July 12, 2018
In cancer cells, genetic errors wreak havoc. Misspelled genes, as well as structural variations—larger-scale rearrangements of DNA that can encompass large chunks of chromosomes—disturb carefully balanced mechanisms that ...

Study shows biomarker panel boosts lung cancer risk assessment for smokers

July 12, 2018
A four-protein biomarker blood test improves lung cancer risk assessment over existing guidelines that rely solely upon smoking history, capturing risk for people who have ever smoked, not only for heavy smokers, an international ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Porgie
1 / 5 (1) Nov 28, 2017
Dirt bags like Bill Gates gives the pathetic Africa tens of millions of dollars for aids research when his own country is being devastated by Diabetes. You have to wonder about his ethics and morals. he does it for the Public relations not the people. What a jerk.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.