Are patients sufficiently shielded against stray radiation during CT scans?

Are patients sufficiently shielded against stray radiation during CT scans?
Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

Radiation exposure during diagnostic imaging such as computed tomography (CT) contributes to a small, but potentially preventable percentage of cancers, yet a new study reports that 40% of hospitals surveyed do not routinely utilize CT shielding. Overall, 99% of the hospitals were aware that shielding can safeguard patients and 84% believed it to be beneficial, so why isn't it being used more routinely—a topic explored in the study published in Journal of Endourology.

The article entitled "Prevalence of Protective Shielding Utilization for Radiation Dose Reduction in Adult Patients Undergoing Body Scanning Using Computed Tomography" was coauthored by Jaime Landman, MD and colleagues from University of California, Irvine.

In their survey of hospital shielding practices during CT imaging, the researchers focused on the protection of four radiosensitive organs: eyes, thyroid, breasts, and gonads.


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More information: Shoaib Safiullah et al, Prevalence of Protective Shielding Utilization for Radiation Dose Reduction in Adult Patients Undergoing Body Scanning Using Computed Tomography, Journal of Endourology (2017). DOI: 10.1089/end.2017.0294
Provided by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
Citation: Are patients sufficiently shielded against stray radiation during CT scans? (2017, November 21) retrieved 17 January 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-11-patients-sufficiently-shielded-stray-ct.html
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