Curcumin improves memory and mood, study says

January 23, 2018 by Leigh Hopper, University of California, Los Angeles
Turmeric (pictured) contains curcumin, which has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Credit: Steven Jackson/Flickr

Lovers of Indian food, give yourselves a second helping: Daily consumption of a certain form of curcumin—the substance that gives Indian curry its bright color—improved memory and mood in people with mild, age-related memory loss, according to the results of a study conducted by UCLA researchers.

The research, published online Jan. 19 in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, examined the effects of an easily absorbed curcumin supplement on memory performance in people without dementia, as well as curcumin's potential impact on the microscopic plaques and tangles in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease.

Found in turmeric, curcumin has previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in lab studies. It also has been suggested as a possible reason that senior citizens in India, where curcumin is a dietary staple, have a lower prevalence of Alzheimer's disease and better cognitive performance.

"Exactly how curcumin exerts its effects is not certain, but it may be due to its ability to reduce brain inflammation, which has been linked to both Alzheimer's disease and major depression," said Dr. Gary Small, director of at UCLA's Longevity Center and of the geriatric psychiatry division at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, and the study's first author.

The double-blind, placebo-controlled study involved 40 adults between the ages of 50 and 90 years who had mild memory complaints. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either a placebo or 90 milligrams of curcumin twice daily for 18 months.

All 40 subjects received standardized cognitive assessments at the start of the study and at six-month intervals, and monitoring of curcumin levels in their blood at the start of the study and after 18 months. Thirty of the volunteers underwent , or PET scans, to determine the levels of amyloid and tau in their brains at the start of the study and after 18 months.

The people who took curcumin experienced significant improvements in their memory and attention abilities, while the subjects who received placebo did not, Small said. In memory tests, the people taking curcumin improved by 28 percent over the 18 months. Those taking curcumin also had mild improvements in mood, and their brain PET scans showed significantly less amyloid and tau signals in the amygdala and hypothalamus than those who took placebos.

The amygdala and hypothalamus are regions of the brain that control several memory and emotional functions.

Four people taking curcumin, and two taking placebos, experienced mild side effects such as abdominal pain and nausea.

The researchers plan to conduct a follow-up study with a larger number of people. That study will include some people with mild depression so the scientists can explore whether curcumin also has antidepressant effects. The larger sample also would allow them to analyze whether curcumin's -enhancing effects vary according to people's genetic risk for Alzheimer's, their age or the extent of their cognitive problems.

"These results suggest that taking this relatively safe form of could provide meaningful cognitive benefits over the years," said Small, UCLA's Parlow–Solomon Professor on Aging.

Explore further: Mechanisms ID'd for curcumin resensitization of cancer cells

More information: Gary W. Small et al. Memory and Brain Amyloid and Tau Effects of a Bioavailable Form of Curcumin in Non-Demented Adults: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled 18-Month Trial, The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (2017). DOI: 10.1016/j.jagp.2017.10.010

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rlmrdl
not rated yet Jan 23, 2018
Interesting to note that you also feature at least one story debunking the claims because curcumin is not easily absorbed, is unstable and a meta analysis suggests the claims cannot be validated. Where are we now? https://medicalxp...tml#nRlv
mqr
3 / 5 (2) Jan 23, 2018
there is more research than contradict that review.....
there is information war within the academic circles...

Scientists work without much hesitation towards the benefits of the pharmaceutical industry: the "post-truth" started at universities.... So you can find articles of university professors lying openly about the effects of plants derivatives that prevent people from getting sick so it reduces the profits of pharmaceutical companies than rather keep them sick, to obtain money from them. In the link posted by the rlmrdl above it says "they could find no evidence of a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial on curcumin". They did not look hard.....

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