Hydrochlorothiazide may up basal, squamous cell cancer risk

Hydrochlorothiazide may up basal, squamous cell cancer risk
(HealthDay)—Hydrochlorothiazide use is associated with an increased risk of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), with evidence of a dose-response relationship, according to a study published online Dec. 3 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Sidsel Arnspang, M.D., from Odense University Hospital in Denmark, and colleagues examined the correlation between hydrochlorothiazide use and the risk of (BCC) and (SCC). Patients with NMSC were identified from the Danish Cancer registry during 2004 to 2012. They were matched in a 1:20 ratio by age and sex with controls.

The researchers found that higher use of hydrochlorothiazide (≥50,000 mg) was associated with odds ratios of 1.29 and 3.98 for BCC and SCC, respectively. There were clear dose-response correlations for hydrochlorothiazide use with BCC and SCC; the odds ratios were 1.54 and 7.38, respectively, for the highest cumulative dose category (≥200,000 mg). There was no for use of other diuretics and antihypertensives with NMSC.

"Hydrochlorothiazide use is associated with a substantially increased risk of NMSC, especially SCC," the authors write.

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.


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Citation: Hydrochlorothiazide may up basal, squamous cell cancer risk (2018, January 6) retrieved 26 March 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-01-hydrochlorothiazide-basal-squamous-cell-cancer.html
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