Low fitness is associated with larger waist size and higher degree of inflammation

January 17, 2018, Public Library of Science
Tape measure. Credit: Quinn Dombrowski, Flickr

Low fitness is associated with a larger waist size and a higher degree of inflammation, according to a study published January 17, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Anne-Sophie Wedell-Neergaard from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues.

Waist circumference can indicate the amount of excess fat found around the abdomen and previous studies have shown excess abdominal fat may increase the risk of chronic system inflammation and metabolic diseases. The authors of the present study sought to investigate the association between fitness and waist circumference as well as the association between fitness and low-grade inflammation, and whether there was a correlation with Body Mass Index (BMI).

The researchers analyzed the previously collected data of 10,976 individuals from The Danish National Health Examination Survey 2007-2008. These individuals took a (VO2max) test to assess their physical fitness. Their waist circumference, weight and height were measured, and blood samples were taken to measure their level of C-reactive protein, a nonspecific biomarker of low-grade inflammation.

The researchers found that higher levels of fitness were associated with a smaller and a lower degree of inflammation independently of BMI. The researchers acknowledge that there are possible limitations that may affect the findings of the study, but overall the results suggest that increased fitness has the potential to reduce abdominal fat mass and inflammation which may improve metabolic health irrespective of BMI.

"We found that fitness is inversely associated with both abdominal adiposity and low-grade inflammation independent of BMI," says Wedell-Neergaard. "These results suggest that, regardless of BMI, high levels lead to a reduction in abdominal fat mass and low-grade ."

Explore further: Study finds childhood fitness reduces long-term cardiovascular risks of childhood obesity

More information: PLOS ONE (2018). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0190645

Related Stories

Study finds childhood fitness reduces long-term cardiovascular risks of childhood obesity

May 24, 2016
A new study from a group of international researchers has identified a potentially effective tool to reduce the long-term health risks of childhood obesity-aerobic exercise.

BMI is underestimating obesity in Australia, waist circumference needs to be measured too

December 20, 2017
A new study has found the waistlines of Australian adults are increasing faster than body weight.

Waist circumference linked to diabetes risk, independently of body mass index

June 5, 2012
A collaborative re-analysis of data from the InterAct case-control study conducted by Claudia Langenberg and colleagues has established that waist circumference is associated with risk of type 2 diabetes, independently of ...

Abdominal obesity ups risk of hip fracture

February 27, 2015
(HealthDay)—Abdominal obesity is associated with increased risk of hip fracture, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Study finds that higher BMI and waist circumference are associated with increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer

June 2, 2016
A study of almost 150,000 men from 8 European countries, presented at this year's European Obesity Summit (Gothenburg, 1-4 June) shows that higher body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference are associated with an increased ...

Recommended for you

Self-lubricating latex could boost condom use: study

October 17, 2018
A perpetually unctuous, self-lubricating latex developed by a team of scientists in Boston could boost the use of condoms, they reported Wednesday in the journal Royal Society Open Science.

Engineered enzyme eliminates nicotine addiction in preclinical tests

October 17, 2018
Oct. 17, 2018—Scientists at Scripps Research have successfully tested a potential new smoking-cessation treatment in rodents.

How healthy will we be in 2040?

October 17, 2018
A new scientific study of forecasts and alternative scenarios for life expectancy and major causes of death in 2040 shows all countries are likely to experience at least a slight increase in lifespans. In contrast, one scenario ...

Study finds evidence of intergenerational transmission of trauma among ex-POWs from the Civil War

October 16, 2018
A trio of researchers affiliated with the National Bureau of Economic Research has found evidence that suggests men who were traumatized while POWs during the U.S. Civil War transmitted that trauma to their offspring—many ...

Father's nicotine use can cause cognitive problems in children and grandchildren

October 16, 2018
A father's exposure to nicotine may cause cognitive deficits in his children and even grandchildren, according to a study in mice publishing on October 16 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Pradeep Bhide of Florida ...

Many supplements contain unapproved, dangerous ingredients: study

October 13, 2018
(HealthDay)—U.S. health officials have issued more than 700 warnings during the last decade about the sale of dietary supplements that contain unapproved and potentially dangerous drug ingredients, new research reveals.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.