Vaping may be bad for kids, good for adults: study

January 23, 2018
A New York man puffs away on his electronic cigarette. E-cigarettes may encourage youths to start smoking but may also help adults quit, according to a US review of scientific research

Vaping, or smoking battery powered devices known as e-cigarettes, may encourage youths to start smoking but may also help adults quit, said a US review of scientific research out Tuesday.

The report by the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is based on more than 800 peer-reviewed scientific studies on the health effects of .

It was compiled at the request of the US Congress, amid a growing international debate over whether e-cigarettes are safe or harmful.

E-cigarettes, which have gained popularity in the last decade, are handheld devices that heat up a nicotine-containing liquid so users can inhale the vapors.

They contain "fewer numbers and lower levels of toxic substances than conventional cigarettes," said the report.

But they are also addictive.

The amount of nicotine they deliver can vary, but experienced adult users tend to get "a comparable level of nicotine as conventional cigarettes"—leading to "symptoms of dependence" in those who use them.

Reviewed evidence suggests that e-cigarettes are "likely to be far less harmful than tobacco products," said David Eaton, chair of the committee that wrote the report.

"In some circumstances, such as their use by non- adolescents and young , their adverse effects clearly warrant concern," said Eaton, dean of the graduate school of the University of Washington, Seattle.

Young people are more likely than adults to use e-cigarettes, and the report found "substantial evidence" that vaping increases the risk of smoking conventional cigarettes.

But when adult smokers use e-cigarettes to quit smoking, "they offer an opportunity to reduce smoking-related illness," said Eaton.

The report found "conclusive evidence" that substituting e-cigarettes for conventional cigarettes "reduces users' exposure to many toxicants and carcinogens present in conventional cigarettes."

Switching from regular cigarettes to e-cigarettes also "results in reduced short-term adverse health outcomes in several organ systems."

But their long term effects remain unknown.

The report found "no available evidence whether or not e-cigarette use" is associated with cancer in people. Animal studies however suggest that long-term e-cigarette use "could increase the risk of cancer."

Researchers also declined to categorize e-cigarettes as a positive or negative influence on public health.

"More and better research on e-cigarettes' short- and long-term effects on health and on their relationship to conventional smoking is needed to answer that question with clarity," said the .

Explore further: New report one of the most comprehensive studies on health effects of e-cigarettes

Related Stories

New report one of the most comprehensive studies on health effects of e-cigarettes

January 23, 2018
A new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine takes a comprehensive look at evidence on the human health effects of e-cigarettes. Although the research base is limited ...

Can e-cigarettes help smokers quit?

December 29, 2017
As e-cigarettes become more popular, fewer people are taking up smoking traditional cigarettes. But can e-cigarettes, an electronic nicotine delivery system, help people quit smoking altogether? That was the focus of a recent ...

Are e-cigarettes with higher nicotine associated with more smoking, vaping?

October 23, 2017
The use of electronic cigarettes with higher nicotine concentrations by high school students in California was associated with a greater likelihood of subsequent use of conventional combustible cigarettes and e-cigarettes, ...

Vaping doubles risk of smoking cigarettes for teens

September 18, 2017
Teenagers who try e-cigarettes double their risk for smoking tobacco cigarettes, according to a new study.

E-cigarettes safer than smoking, says long-term study

February 6, 2017
E-cigarettes are less toxic and safer to use compared to conventional cigarettes, according to research published in Annals of Internal Medicine today (Monday).

E-cigarettes lead to 'real' smoking by teens: review

June 28, 2017
(HealthDay)—Teens and young adults who use electronic cigarettes—also known as vaping—are almost four times as likely as their non-vaping counterparts to begin smoking traditional cigarettes, a new review suggests.

Recommended for you

Experts caution study on plastics in humans is premature

October 23, 2018
Scientists in Austria say they've detected tiny bits of plastic in people's stool for the first time, but experts caution the study is too small and premature to draw any credible conclusion.

Can organic food help you reduce your risk of cancer? A new study suggests the answer may be yes

October 22, 2018
To reduce your risk of cancer, you know you should quit smoking, exercise regularly, wear sunscreen, and take advantage of screening tests. New research suggests another item might be added to this list: Choose organic foods ...

A topical gel that can prevent nerve damage due to spraying crops with pesticides

October 22, 2018
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in India has developed a topical get that can be used by farmers to prevent nerve damage due to chemical crop spraying. In their paper published in the journal Science ...

Moderate exercise before conception resulted in lower body weight, increased insulin sensitivity of offspring

October 22, 2018
Men who want to have children in the near future should consider hitting the gym.

Modern conflict: Screen time vs. nature

October 22, 2018
Even rural kids today spend more time in front of screens and less time outdoors, according to a new study of middle-school students in South Carolina.

Community health workers can reduce hospitalizations by 65 percent and double patient satisfaction with primary care

October 22, 2018
Community health workers—trusted laypeople from local communities who help high-risk patients to address social issues like food and housing insecurity—can help reduce hospital stays by 65 percent and double the rate ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.