New approach reduces immune response to tissue engineered vascular grafts

February 7, 2018, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

Using RNA interference (RNAi) technology to silence an immune-stimulating complex in endothelial cells (EC), the main cellular component of blood vessels, researchers have made it possible to use the plentiful supply of donor ECs instead of a patient's own cells to generate tissue engineered vascular grafts for transplantation. This innovative method, in which the treated EC retain their key features and functions, is reported in Tissue Engineering, Part A.

In the article entitled "Low Immunogenic Endothelial Cells Maintain Morphofunctional Properties Needed for Tissue Engineering," Skadi Lau, Dorothee Eicke, Constança Figueiredo, Ulrike Böer, and coauthors from Hannover Medical School, Germany describe their approach using lentiviral vector-mediated RNAi to silence the (HLA) class I complex in donor EC collected from three different sources: peripheral blood, umbilical cord blood, and vein. The researchers demonstrated that HLA I-silenced EC were still able to express essential surface biomarkers and compounds needed to form a tight barrier between cells, to produce factors important for blood coagulation and regulating blood vessel tone, and to form capillary-like tube structures when put into 3D fibrin gels.

"This article demonstrates the impact of RNA interference technology on the development of tissue engineered leveraging available allogeneic cell sources," says Tissue Engineering Co-Editor-in-Chief Antonios G. Mikos, PhD, Louis Calder Professor at Rice University, Houston, TX.

Explore further: Vascular bypass grafting: A biomimetic engineering approach

More information: Skadi Lau et al, Low Immunogenic Endothelial Cells Maintain Morphological and Functional Properties Required for Vascular Tissue Engineering, Tissue Engineering Part A (2017). DOI: 10.1089/ten.tea.2016.0541

Related Stories

Vascular bypass grafting: A biomimetic engineering approach

January 23, 2018
When a patient with heart disease is in need of a vascular graft but doesn't have any viable veins or arteries in his or her own body, surgeons can rely on synthetic, tissue-engineering grafts. However, the body often treats ...

Heparan sulfate biomaterials retain structure and function after gamma irradiation

January 25, 2018
A new study has shown that heparan sulfate, a desirable natural material for use in bioengineered tissues and orthotic implants, can withstand the stress of gamma irradiation for sterilization and retain its structure, binding ...

Bioengineered blood vessel appears safe for dialysis patients

May 13, 2016
Man-made blood vessels developed by researchers at Duke University, Yale University and the tissue engineering company Humacyte appear to be both safe and more durable than commonly used synthetic versions in patients undergoing ...

New recombinant antibody can isolate stem cells from umbilical cord blood

September 3, 2013
A new recombinant antibody can detect and isolate mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a nonembryonic source of stem cells with promising applications in tissue engineering, blood stem cell transplantation, and treatments for immune-mediated ...

New tissue-engineered blood vessel replacements one step closer to human trials

November 1, 2017
Researchers at the University of Minnesota have created a new lab-grown blood vessel replacement that is composed completely of biological materials, but surprisingly doesn't contain any living cells at implantation. The ...

Researchers propose mechanism for spread of metastatic breast cancer to bone

November 4, 2016
New research explains how metastatic breast cancer cells might use bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to help them spread to bone tissue. A study using a 3D scaffold model has shown that breast tumor-derived ...

Recommended for you

Gene plays critical role in noise-induced deafness

October 19, 2018
In experiments using mice, a team of UC San Francisco researchers has discovered a gene that plays an essential role in noise-induced deafness. Remarkably, by administering an experimental chemical—identified in a separate ...

Functional engineered oesophagus could pave way for clinical trials 

October 18, 2018
The world's first functional oesophagus engineered from stem cells has been grown and successfully transplanted into mice, as part of a pioneering new study led by UCL.

New findings cast light on lymphatic system, key player in human health

October 16, 2018
Scientists at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation have broken new ground in understanding how the lymphatic system works, potentially opening the door for future therapies.

New model suggests cuffless, non-invasive blood pressure monitoring possible using pulse waves

October 16, 2018
A large team of researchers from several institutions in China and the U.S. has developed a model that suggests it should be possible to create a cuffless, non-invasive blood pressure monitor based on measuring pulse waves. ...

Age-related increase in estrogen may cause common men's hernia

October 16, 2018
An age-related increase in estrogen may be the culprit behind inguinal hernias, a condition common among elderly men that often requires corrective surgery, according to a Northwestern Medicine study was published Oct. 15 ...

Income and wealth affect the mental health of Australians, study shows

October 16, 2018
Australians who have higher incomes and greater wealth are more likely to experience better mental health throughout their lives, new research led by the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre has found.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.