Fewer people being referred to fall prevention programs, new study says

February 12, 2018 by Yasmine Phillips, Curtin University

More than half of older West Australians who reported falling over in the past year did not seek medical assistance, new Curtin University-led research has found, with a significant decline in the number of people being referred to prevention programs after a fall over the past decade.

The research, published in Clinical Interventions in Aging today, compared the rate of falls among WA community care clients aged 65 and over between 2005 and 2015, finding 47.7 percent of had fallen in the previous year – in line with the rate of 45 percent reported 10 years ago.

Based on a 2015 survey of 1,991 , 60 percent of those who had fallen said they had sustained an injury from it in the past year, with the most common injuries including bruises, cuts and scratches, injuries to the head or face, and fractures to any part of the body.

Lead author Dr. Elissa Burton, from the School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science at Curtin University, said just 27.4 percent of people who had reported falling said they had been referred to a fall prevention program in the past year, marking a decrease on the 31 percent result from a decade ago.

"People who reported having been referred to a health professional or program to prevent falls in the past year were 47 percent less likely to have fallen than those who had not," Dr. Burton said.

"Respondents who thought that they would definitely fall or were unsure whether they might fall were also found to have a higher likelihood of having fallen in the past year.

"Our results indicate the importance of community care organisations incorporating balance exercise programs into their services and referring their clients to a falls prevention service or program as soon as a fall has taken place or someone is considered at high risk of falling."

Of the people aged 65 years and over who did seek after a fall (42 percent), 45 percent said they saw a doctor in the emergency department or hospital, 31.8 percent saw their local general practitioner and 7.9 percent visited a physiotherapist.

While 48 percent of survey respondents reported falling during the previous year, almost one-third said they had suffered a fall in the month prior to completing the survey.

Of those who had fallen at some time during the previous year, 41.9 percent (398 people) reported falling once, 24.3 percent (231 people) twice and 12.3 percent (117 people) three times. Fourteen respondents reported falling more than 12 times during the year, with two people, who both reported balance problems, estimating 60 falls each.

Dr. Burton said one million older Australians are receiving government-funded community aged care services, including domestic assistance, personal care, nursing, transport, gardening and social support.

"Many older people receiving community aged care services will have experienced decreases in strength and balance, bouts of illness, and ongoing pain or injury, which also increase their risk of falling," Dr. Burton.

"Given almost 100,000 people were hospitalised due to falls in 2012-13, it is so important to gain a better understanding of the causes and prevalence of falls to prevent older Australians from suffering injuries."

Just under half (49 percent) of the respondents who had fallen in the past year said they had fallen in their home, more than a quarter said it had occurred in their yard and 12.9 percent in a public place.

The most common reasons for having fallen included tripping (25.5 percent), over balancing or over reaching (25.3 percent), and legs giving way (18.4 percent), followed by not concentrating (16.2 percent) and rushing (10.6 percent).

The survey was completed by 1,991 people aged 65 years and over who were receiving care from 10 community care organisations in WA. Respondents reported living in their own home or unit, an independent living unit in a retirement village or government housing.

Explore further: Many falls in advanced age result in hospital admission

More information: Elissa Burton et al. Falls prevention in community care: 10 years on, Clinical Interventions in Aging (2018). DOI: 10.2147/CIA.S153687

Related Stories

Many falls in advanced age result in hospital admission

December 11, 2014
More than a third of people in advanced age had a fall in the last 12 months, and of those 20 percent needed hospitalisation, according to research from the University of Auckland.

Study finds need for educating older adults on outdoor fall prevention

May 19, 2017
Many older adults have fallen outdoors but lack an understanding of the risks for falling and how to prevent them, warranting efforts for outdoor fall prevention, finds a new study by New York University researchers.

Study suggests being proud may protect against falls in older people

December 11, 2017
Contrary to the old saying "pride comes before a fall", the opposite appears to be true, according to a study published in the Christmas issue of The BMJ.

Emergency department visits not a catalyst for falls prevention activities

August 8, 2017
Adults age 65 and older who go to the emergency department (ED) for a fall-related injury are not likely to participate in a fall prevention program after being discharged, despite being given a flyer for a local program ...

Falls also problem for middle-aged with arthritis

May 1, 2014
A new study shows falls are just as much of a problem for middle-aged adults with arthritis as they are for older people.

Collaboration between EMS and primary care physicians could reduce unnecessary emergency transport for fallen seniors

December 11, 2017
A protocol that couples paramedic assessment with primary care physician consultation and timely follow up significantly reduced unnecessary ambulance transport for fallen elderly residents of assisted living facilities. ...

Recommended for you

Why we shouldn't like coffee, but we do

November 15, 2018
Why do we like the bitter taste of coffee? Bitterness evolved as a natural warning system to protect the body from harmful substances. By evolutionary logic, we should want to spit it out.

Survey reveals how we use music as a possible sleep aid

November 14, 2018
Many individuals use music in the hope that it fights sleep difficulties, according to a study published November 14 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tabitha Trahan of the University of Sheffield, UK, and colleagues. ...

Colder, darker climates increase alcohol consumption and liver disease

November 14, 2018
Where you live could influence how much you drink. According to new research from the University of Pittsburgh Division of Gastroenterology, people living in colder regions with less sunlight drink more alcohol than their ...

Want to cut down on your meds? Your pharmacist can help.

November 14, 2018
Pharmacists are pivotal in the process of deprescribing risky medications in seniors, leading many to stop taking unnecessary sleeping pills, anti-inflammatories and other drugs, a new Canadian study has found.

No accounting for these tastes: Artificial flavors a mystery

November 13, 2018
Six artificial flavors are being ordered out of the food supply in a dispute over their safety, but good luck to anyone who wants to know which cookies, candies or drinks they're in.

Your heart hates air pollution. Portable filters could help

November 13, 2018
Microscopic particles floating in the air we breathe come from sources such as fossil fuel combustion, fires, cigarettes and vehicles. Known as fine particulate matter, this form of air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.