Prenatal, early life fructose intake associated with asthma

February 9, 2018

(HealthDay)—Maternal prenatal and early childhood intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and fructose is associated with current asthma in midchildhood, regardless of adiposity, according to a study published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

Lakiea S. Wright, M.D., from Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and colleagues used food frequency questionnaires to examine maternal pregnancy and child intake of and total fructose in 1,068 mother-child pairs. The correlations of quartiles of maternal and child sugar-sweetened beverage, juice, and total fructose intake were assessed with child current in mid-childhood (median age, 7.7 years).

Comparing quartile four with quartile one, the researchers found that increased odds of mid-childhood current asthma were associated with higher maternal pregnancy intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (odds ratio, 1.70 [95 percent confidence interval, 1.08 to 2.67]) and total fructose (odds ratio, 1.58 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.98 to 2.53]). Adjustments were made for prepregnancy body mass index and other covariates. There was a correlation between higher early childhood fructose intake with mid-childhood current asthma in models adjusted for maternal sugar-sweetened beverages (odds ratio, 1.79 [95 percent confidence interval, 1.07 to 2.97]) and after also adjusting for mid-childhood z-score (odds ratio, 1.77 [95 percent confidence interval, 1.06 to 2.95]).

"Higher sugar-sweetened beverage and intake during pregnancy and in early childhood was associated with childhood asthma development independent of adiposity," the authors write.

Explore further: Consuming sugary drinks during pregnancy may increase asthma risk in mid-childhood

More information: Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

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AmeriBev
1 / 5 (1) Feb 13, 2018
America's leading beverage companies provide Americans with a wide range of beverage choices, including many with less sugar or no sugar at all. This study, however, does not prove that drinking beverages with sugar in any way causes asthma.

We've been broadening beverage choices dramatically through innovations like lower calorie sodas, teas, sports drinks, flavored waters, enhanced waters and premium waters. We've developed mid-calorie versions of longtime favorites; we created mini-cans. The beverage aisle looks much different today than just 10 years ago. We are committed to being part of real solutions to public health challenges with initiatives like Balance Calories - an initiative to reduce the calories Americans consume from beverages nationally by 20 percent by 2025.

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