Discovery uncovers clue to disarm gonorrhea superbug

March 30, 2018, Monash University
(L-R): Dr. Pankaj Deo and Dr. Thomas Naderer from the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute. Credit: Monash University

Every year, more than 100 million people worldwide develop the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhoea, with health consequences such as infertility, transmission of the disease to newborn babies, and increased risk of HIV infections. There has been a 63 per cent rise in gonorrhoea in Australia over the past five years.

Gonorrhoea is caused by bacteria which can rapidly develop resistance to all known antibiotics—commonly called 'superbugs'. Gonorrhoea superbugs have now been detected in every Australian state and territory and are increasingly difficult to treat in the clinic.

Monash University researchers have discovered a way the gonorrhoea bacteria cleverly evade the immune system—opening up the way for therapies that prevent this process, allowing the body's natural defences to kill the bug.

Published today in PLOS Pathogens, Dr. Thomas Naderer and Dr. Pankaj Deo and their team from the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute, have discovered how the gonorrhoea-causing superbug (which is very small) creates even smaller packages of bacterial membrane blebs, termed vesicles, which attack .

Using cutting-edge super-resolution microscopy, which is able to see, and film, the most minute of events—the researchers found that these interacted with the cells in the human immune system called 'macrophages', triggering these to die in an orchestrated suicide process. Macrophages are the cells within the immune system that ordinarily kill foreign invaders like bacteria and viruses, so without them the gonorrhoea bacteria can flourish.

Dr. Naderer said that this new understanding of how the gonorrhoea bacteria interact and cause the death of "may lead to strategies to combat infection and its symptoms".

The research may also provide information as to how other evade the immune system and be unaffected by antibiotics. The 2016 Review on Antimicrobial Resistance Final Report and Recommendations states that antibiotic resistant infection will kill an extra 10 million people a year worldwide—more than currently die from cancer—by 2050 unless action is taken.

The full paper in PLOS Pathogens is titled 'Outer membrane vesicles from Neisseria gonorrhoeae target PorB to mitochondria and induce apoptosis.'

Explore further: New drugs needed against gonorrhoea: UN

More information: PLOS Pathogens, DOI: 10.1371/1006945

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Osiris1
2 / 5 (1) Mar 31, 2018
All cases of 'Siff'...syphillis, 'TB' ... tuberculosis, and 'Lepers' .... leprosy, etc, were once housed lifelong in colonies to separate them from further spreading their diseases. We may have to rethink the old ways in the light of the apparent fact that we ARE headed there AGAIN! Facilitating this will require new laws and court tests to adjudicate the 'right to spread disease in the pursuit of a living' issues as well as disposing of wealth based immunity to isolations issues..... (rich will not 'wanna go' and may buy their own twisted 'justice') Such should not be horrid places of no hope, but pleasant places for them to spend the rest of there shortened lives.

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