U.K. man found to have gonorrhea resistant to conventional treatments

March 30, 2018 by Bob Yirka, Medical Xpress report
Credit: CDC

Researchers at Public Health England have announced, as reported by the BBC, that a U.K. man has contracted a case of gonorrhea that is resistant to the two types of antibiotics that are normally used to treat such infections. It is, they further report, the first known instance of a case where a strain of the bacteria has developed resistance to both treatments.

The man was reportedly in a relationship with a woman in the U.K. but contracted the STD while traveling in Southeast Asia—officials are looking for that female partner but have not yet found her. The man, who has requested his name be withheld, has claimed that he had no other . His relationship partner in the U.K. was not infected. Officials would very much like to find the woman that transmitted the infection to the U.K. man and any other partners she might have had, hoping to head off an outbreak of an untreatable STD. The WHO has reported that approximately 78 million people each year contract infections and that the bacteria is effectively adapting to overcome . The development of a strain that has developed resistance to amps up fears that soon all bacterial infections will be untreatable, as more of them develop resistance.

Gonorrhea is an infection caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and is usually localized to the site of . A large portion of those who become infected never have any symptoms—others are not so lucky, and develop pain in testicle ducts or in the pelvis in women. Infections have been known to cause infertility in some instances, and very rarely, death, in the event that bacteria spread to other vital parts of the body. Notably, there is a vaccine against gonorrhea, but it has proven to be effective in only 31 percent of cases.

The team treating the infected man has reported that another antibiotic, ertapenem, is now being used—it is considered a last-line-of-defense antibiotic. Thus far, it seems to be working, but the researchers will not know for sure until sometime next month.

Doctors and medical researchers strongly suggest that sexually active people use condoms.

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Osiris1
1 / 5 (1) Mar 31, 2018
That lady may be a sex worker, possibly an illegal alien in the nation where the 'victim' either 'found' her or more likely she found 'him'! Either way is likely part of some national underclass. May be verrrry hard to find inasmuch as the 'finding' will be accompanied by a 'treating'.... by the police in that nation. If found with drugs, and such is likely, she may be examined and then executed in some nations like Malaysia. Otherwise she will be imprisoned, maybe for life if 'black clap' is diagnosed by local national health official or his 'representative' who could be as low as an assistant medic. Such would be done to safeguard the local population or to make sure her presence does not 'scare away the tourists'. Did I say: "Hard to find"?, as she would know all too well what she faces; and also knows of maybe her children who would be left to starve to death when she was 'removed'. The 'innocent' Englishman needs to be isolated for life as well as his local 'contacts'
Osiris1
1 / 5 (1) Mar 31, 2018
I might add about that area of the world where sex is furtive and hidden outside of red light districts where it is 'tolerated' to attract money spending 'tourists'... 'She' might not even be a 'she'!

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