Discovering crucial role of protein that could stop HPV virus infection

April 30, 2018, University of Leeds
Discovering crucial role of protein that could stop HPV virus infection
Credit: University of Leeds

New drugs in the early stages of development by pharmaceutical companies could have an extra benefit – the ability to cancel out HPV virus, which can cause cervical cancer and skin conditions.

Scientists at the University of Leeds and University of Birmingham, whose research focuses on Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), say many people are unaware it is also responsible for numerous other cancers, especially those affecting the head and neck, which are increasing and becoming more prevalent in men.

They have now discovered the role of one of the crucial proteins responsible for allowing HPV to infect . It is called STAT3 and is essential for HPV to replicate.

The team, led by Dr. Andrew Macdonald at the University's Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, said without STAT3 the could not work because the full set of properties it needed would not be available.

Completing the pathway

His team, funded by Wellcome and the Medical Research Council, has also found the individual enzymes which activates STAT3 in cells infected with HPV.

Uncovering the identity and role of these enzymes which 'switch on' STAT3 completes the chain and means scientists have a new pathway to work through to target HPV-based cancers.

Dr. Macdonald said the fact drugs were already being developed which targeted the same enzymes for other uses meant the possibility of a new treatment could be much closer to becoming a reality.

He said: "We need to find new ways of treating HPV cancers, so we have been working towards understanding how the virus works and interacts with cells.

"Now we have identified both the role of STAT3 and how it is activated, we have a potential target for future studies in combating HPV associated disease.

"We know there are various drugs being developed that have the potential to target the enzymes we are dealing with for other purposes. This is great news because it means that while there is still a long way to go, we are already over the first hurdle."

Controlling the virus

The team used samples of donated to understand how the virus increased cell growth, and found that when STAT3 was not active, this was prevented.

Ph.D. researcher Ethan Morgan, who carried out much of the lab work to identify the roles of STAT3 and the enzymes that switch it on, added: "The process of uncovering these enzymes and the way they activate STAT3 has been really important because we have now found an approach which could prevent HPV infection. The next step for us will be more time in the lab refining our work and then confirming the role of STAT3 in HPV associated cancers."

Currently there is no screening programme for head and neck cancers and, while there is a HPV vaccine, it is only effective if administered before infection with the virus.

The research has been published in the journal PLoS Pathogens.

Explore further: Researchers explore the function of a protein involved in cell proliferation, survival and migration

More information: Ethan L. Morgan et al. STAT3 activation by E6 is essential for the differentiation-dependent HPV18 life cycle, PLOS Pathogens (2018). DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1006975

Related Stories

Researchers explore the function of a protein involved in cell proliferation, survival and migration

June 17, 2016
Hokkaido University scientists are getting closer to understanding the function of a protein involved in vital cellular processes. This may lead to the discovery of drugs that can treat some cancers and autoimmune disorders.

No 'brakes': Study finds mechanism for increased activity of oncogene in certain cancers

January 6, 2014
The increased activation of a key oncogene in head and neck cancers could be the result of mutation and dysfunction of regulatory proteins that are supposed to keep the gene, which has the potential to cause cancer, in check, ...

Scientists discover critical anti-viral role of biological molecule

January 26, 2017
Scientists have discovered that a biological molecule important in cell growth (STAT3) is also critical in protecting us against infection - so much so that we would be unable to fight the common flu virus without it. Their ...

Researchers reveal how a protein common in cancers jumps anti-tumor mechanisms

March 17, 2014
A Stony Brook University-led international team of infectious disease researchers have discovered how a cellular protein, called STAT3, which is overactive in a majority of human cancers, interferes with an antitumor mechanism ...

Researchers design small molecule to disrupt cancer-causing protein

March 26, 2013
Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center and colleagues at the University of South Florida have developed a small molecule that inhibits STAT3, a protein that causes cancer. This development could impact the treatment of several ...

Mutations in key cancer protein suggest new route to treatments

November 19, 2015
For years, scientists have struggled to find a way to block a protein known to play an important role in many cancers. The protein, STAT3, acts as a transcription factor—it performs the crucial task of helping convert DNA ...

Recommended for you

Deadly Rift Valley fever: New insight, and hope for the future

July 19, 2018
Health control measures alone could be ineffective in the long term fight against the deadly Rift Valley fever which affects both humans and animals, a new study in the journal PNAS reports.

New guidelines to diagnose, manage rare endocrine disorders

July 19, 2018
International guidelines have been published for the first time to help doctors around the globe diagnose and manage patients with a very rare set of endocrine diseases known as pseudohypoparathyroidism and its related disorders, ...

Overuse of antibiotics not what the doctor ordered

July 19, 2018
With increased use of antibiotics worldwide linked to growing antibiotic resistance, a world-first study co-authored by a QUT researcher has highlighted the growing impact of non-prescription supply of antibiotics in community ...

Alcohol-related cirrhosis deaths skyrocket in young adults

July 18, 2018
Deaths from cirrhosis rose in all but one state between 1999-2016, with increases seen most often among young adults, a new study shows.

Hidden blood in feces may signal deadly conditions

July 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Even if it's not visible to the naked eye, blood in the stool can be serious—a sign of a potentially fatal disease other than colon cancer, new research suggests.

Childhood abuse linked to greater risk of endometriosis, study finds

July 17, 2018
Endometriosis, a painful condition that affects one in 10 reproductive-age women in the U.S., has been linked to childhood physical and sexual abuse, according to findings published today in the journal Human Reproduction.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.